Best Tree Service in Daniel Island

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The Planet Green Tree Service Difference

At Planet Green Tree Service, we are firm believers that trees make the world a better place. They provide us with verdant beauty, cool shade, and emergency shelter. They raise our home values, add personality to our neighborhoods, and provide us with clean air to breathe. When your home or business has well-maintained, healthy trees, everyone benefits. That’s why we are so passionate about providing our customers with dependable tree services in the Lowcountry.

We believe that honest prices, state-of-the-art equipment, friendly arborists, and good old-fashioned hard work are what set us apart from our competition. With more than 33 years of service in South Carolina, you can rest easy knowing every member of the Planet Green team is committed to the following:

  • Conduct themselves in a professional manner
  • Provide you with exemplary tree care services
  • Arrive at your home or business on time and ready to work
  • Provide you with affordable service rates
  • Meet or exceed our industry standards
  • Utilize the utmost safety when removing or maintaining your trees or shrubs
  • Have full insurance to protect themselves and your home

Our customers mean a lot to us, which is why we strive to provide them the best, most helpful customer service in our industry. When you hire our company to perform a tree service in cityname, know that we take this responsibility seriously and will always treat your home like we would treat our own. At Planet Green Tree Service, you won’t ever have to worry about sneaky hidden fees or outrageous pricing. We believe every homeowner and business owner should have access to affordable tree services, which is why we set our rates at reasonable levels. Our job is to protect your home, your trees, and also your wallet!

Service Areas

Service

Whether your home has overgrown trees that need trimming or you have an unsightly stump that needs grinding, our team of tree experts is here to help. Curious what kind of tree care work we provide to homeowners in South Carolina?

Planet Green specializes in the following areas:

Tree Trimming in Daniel Island

Have you noticed your favorite tree growing in a strange shape? Are your trees or shrubs so overgrown that it’s making your property and home look unkempt? Are the trees near your home weighed down by dangerous dead branches? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, it might be time to speak with a Planet Green Tree Service professional to find a solution.

Like anything that lives, trees respond to their environment. When trees are not properly maintained, they can cause a whole host of problems for the homeowner. Overgrowth doesn’t just look bad – it can be a potential safety hazard and liability for your home. To prevent this from happening, it’s crucial that your trees are trimmed and pruned regularly. Trimming your trees and shrubs gives your home a tidy, appealing look and facilitates healthy plant and tree growth.

Because every tree and shrub is different, you must approach tree trimming with a plan. Before you start hacking at your trees with a machete, be sure to contact Planet Green Tree Service. Our team of expert arborists will come to your home and determine the best path to take for your tree trimming needs. We always take into account variables like the strengths, weaknesses, and species of your trees.

Tree Trimming in Daniel Island

Benefits of Tree Trimming in Daniel Island

For some folks, tree trimming seems like a minor detail in the grand scheme of homeownership. It can be a tedious job, but keeping your trees trimmed and well-maintained is more important than you might think. Below are just a few of the many benefits of keeping your trees and shrubs trimmed:

Tree Trimming in Daniel Island

Tree Health

Part of the Planet Green pruning and trimming process includes the removal of damaged, broken, dead, and diseased branches. When ignored, these dead or dying branches can cause harmful fungi to wreak havoc on the trees around your home or business. Removing these weakened branches helps prevent fungi and keeps your trees healthy. In addition, tree trimming also lets more sunlight and air circulation reach your trees, boosting overall health.

Safety

Safety

As longtime residents of South Carolina, we know how dangerous hurricanes and heavy storms can be. Strong winds from these natural occurrences can cause branches to fall or even be carried away with significant force. This is concerning for many homeowners, especially those who have trees lining their driveways, recreational areas, and walking paths. When you trust Planet Green with your trimming needs, you are actually doing your part to “storm proof” your home from hazardous tree-related accidents. If you have low-hanging branches close to your roof or business, pruning these trees can provide more safety and overhead clearance. That way, don’t have an anxiety attack every time a storm rolls through your neighborhood.

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

Nobody likes the look of an overgrown, disheveled tree. Tree trimming improves the general appearance of your tree and makes your whole yard and home look better. Tree trimming also prevents your trees from growing weak branches and crotches and helps stop branches from intertwining with one another.

Developmental Tree Trimming

Developmental Tree Trimming

Pruning younger trees is key to protecting them as they age. This vital tree service in Daniel Island keeps young trees aesthetically appealing and promotes proper structural integrity and optimal branch structure. In addition, as your home’s landscape matures, taking the time to trim young trees reduces the chance of expensive problems like tree failure.

Types of Tree Trimming

Types of Tree Trimming

Not all tree trimming services from Planet Green Tree Service are the same. Our experts specialize in a number of different tree trimming services to ensure you are getting the right kind of trim for the appropriate situation. Because even the smallest mistake can permanently affect your tree’s health, we approach every tree trimming job with surgeon-like precision. That way, you know your trees are in capable, responsible hands.

Crown Reduction

Crown Reduction

When your trees age without the proper kind of care, they can develop too many branches on their interior. Trees like this give great shade, but too much is not a good sign. That’s where crown reduction trimming comes in. By reducing the density of your tree’s crown, our tree care experts improve its growth rate and health. Crown density reduction also promotes a longer lifespan and a more beautiful appearance.

Deadwooding

Deadwooding

As the name implies, deadwooding involves the trimming of dead wood from your trees. Often required in urban and suburban areas, deadwooding a tree makes it look more attractive and livelier, while maintaining the health of your tree’s trunk by removing rotted branches. This process also makes it safer for kids and other people who walk underneath or near your tree that may be harmed by rotting branches that fall. Other tree trimming services that Planet Green offers include: hazardous tree assessments, shrub trimming, pruning, cabling, bracing, and corrective trimming.

Stump Removal in Daniel Island

For most property owners, removing a tree can seem like a major project. While that notion certainly isn’t wrong, tree removal is more straightforward and often easier than trying to remove an unsightly stump from your yard. Have you ever wondered why you see so many yards with stumps dotted around the land? It’s because they’re very difficult to remove. That is why Planet Green Tree Service has been offering stump removal services in South Carolina for more than 33 years. Our skilled stump removal experts bring a wealth of knowledge and cutting-edge tools to every stump removal project they tackle.

The fact of the matter is this: trying to remove a stump on your own is an incredible undertaking. Going the “DIY” route can take weeks to complete, even if you spend an hour or two every day. There’s also the issue of operating heavy machinery (which costs time and money to rent) and even light fires to expedite the process, which is dangerous. For these reasons alone, we always recommend that you bring in a professional to remove your tree stump safely and effectively.

Stump Removal in Daniel Island

Benefits of Stump Removal in Daniel Island

Better Looking Yard

Better Looking Yard

If you are a homeowner that loves sculpted hedges, beautiful landscaping, and a tidy law, removing old tree stumps will feel like a huge weight off of your chest. Stump removal not only gives your home more curb appeal, it can actually raise the value of your home. This is particularly pertinent if you are thinking about listing your home for sale in the near future.

More Space

More Space

If your yard is small, even one stump can reduce the amount of space you have in your yard. If you spend a lot of time playing sports or just enjoying your yard space, stump removal is a huge help. After all, nobody wants to toss a football around if there are a bunch of old stumps that you must avoid. Stumps also take up considerable space below ground, with their complicated root systems. Stump removal will give you and your family more room to plant flowers, grow vegetables, install a water feature, and much more.

Eliminate Unwanted Growth

Eliminate Unwanted Growth

When you leave a tree stump in your yard, you could be setting yourself up for unwanted tree growth. This kind of new growth often results in clusters of small trees popping up around the base of the stump. This problem isn’t just unsightly; it can be harmful to any plants near the stump because the new trees will suck up all the water and nutrients out of your soil.

Pest Prevention

Pest Prevention

Tree stumps are notorious for harboring all sorts of pests that can damage your hard and cause expensive problems in your home. We’re talking wood borers, ants, termites, and beetles. If you want to do away with these pests and protect your home, the best course of action is to contact Planet Green Tree Service for a quote on our professional tree removal services.

Reduce Headaches

Reduce Headaches

Sure, you could take the time to do your research on how to remove a stump. You could go to Home Depot, rent a high-powered stump grinder, and risk your health trying to operate it without training. You could spend every winking moment of your free time trying to grind the stump down so you can remove it from your yard. But why go through all that trouble when a trustworthy, experienced stump removal company like Planet Green Tree Service is only a phone call away?

Our team of stump removal professionals uses state-of-the-art tools designed to keep your property damage-free during the removal process. We will turn your yard into a beautiful blank slate, so you can focus on enjoying your stump-free while we haul away all the debris.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With 33 years of experience, it’s no wonder why so many South Carolina locals choose Planet Green Tree Service for tree trimming and stump removal in their city. Clients love us because we believe in exceeding your expectations, no matter how large or small a job is.

  • Conduct themselves in a professional manner
  • Provide you with exemplary tree care services
  • Arrive at your home or business on time and ready to work
  • Provide you with affordable service rates

Contact our office to learn more about our tree services in South Carolina or to schedule your free quote today!

Latest News in Daniel Island

Meeting Notes - January 6, 2022

Here are upcoming development plans before the City of Charleston and results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.Date: Jan. 6• A preliminary subdivision plat for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (first review). The site is a 160.9-acre plat for a major subdivision that would include 164 lots for single family residential development....

Here are upcoming development plans before the City of Charleston and results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Date: Jan. 6

• A preliminary subdivision plat for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (first review). The site is a 160.9-acre plat for a major subdivision that would include 164 lots for single family residential development. The owner is Pulte Home Company LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, cox.w@tandh.com.

• Road construction plans for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (first review). The site is a 160.9-acre plat for road construction plans that would include 164 lots for single family residential development. The owner is Pulte Home Company LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, cox.w@tandh.com.

• Road construction plans for the Marshes at Daniel Island Phases 1A & 1B for a major subdivision at 144 Fairbanks Drive on Daniel Island (8th review). This is a 16.78-acre plat for road construction plans on a 56-lot subdivision. The owner is SM Charleston, LLC. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Zim Fant, zfant@seamonwhiteside.com.

• A site plan for Woodfield Cooper River Farms II at Enterprise Boulevard on Cainhoy (pre-application). This is a 2.7-acre plat for a 71 multifamily unit development. The owner is Woodfield Acquisitions. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Hampton Young, hyoung@seamonwhiteside.com.

Date: Dec. 23

• A preliminary subdivision plat for Parcel K Infrastructure at 2000 Daniel Island Drive on Daniel Island (first review). This is a 36.9-acre plat for public roadway, utilities, stormwater and a major subdivision (4 lots) for future development. The owner is Holder Properties. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Abigail Richardson, arichardson@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• Road construction plans for Parcel K Infrastructure at 2000 Daniel Island Drive on Daniel Island (first review). This is a 36.9-acre plat for public roadway, utilities, stormwater and a major subdivision (4 lots) for future development. The owner is Holder Properties. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Abigail Richardson, arichardson@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

•A site plan for Nowell Creek Multifamily at Daniel Island Drive on Daniel Island (first review). This is a 9.02-acre plat for a 320-unit multifamily development. The owner is Holder Properties. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Rivers Cape, rcape@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• Berkeley County Council meets on the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Berkeley County Administration Building, 1003 Highway 52, Moncks Corner.

• Berkeley County Board of Education meetings are held twice each month. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

• Charleston City Council conducts its meetings on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 5 p.m.

Daniel Island Neighborhood Association to recap 2021, hold officer elections

The Daniel Island Neighborhood Association (DINA) will hold an in-person meeting on Thursday, Jan. 13, for the purpose of electing new officers. The meeting will start at 6:30 p.m. at the new community center at Governor’s Park, 160 Fairbanks Drive.Organizers encourage all Daniel Island residents to attend to learn more about the association, meet the candidates and vote. All residents of Daniel Island are eligible to be members and to vote and there is no fee to join.DINA was founded by a group of citizens in 1997 to add...

The Daniel Island Neighborhood Association (DINA) will hold an in-person meeting on Thursday, Jan. 13, for the purpose of electing new officers. The meeting will start at 6:30 p.m. at the new community center at Governor’s Park, 160 Fairbanks Drive.

Organizers encourage all Daniel Island residents to attend to learn more about the association, meet the candidates and vote. All residents of Daniel Island are eligible to be members and to vote and there is no fee to join.

DINA was founded by a group of citizens in 1997 to address common concerns in relation to the city and development and life on the island. It exists as a civic voice for Daniel Island residents within the City of Charleston and Berkeley County governments as well as surrounding communities.

At the meeting, DINA will hold an election for all board offices, including president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer. Current DINA President Greg Taylor said there will also be a brief year end recap of all that DINA accomplished in 2021. “It’s actually pretty extensive, even given the long, exhausting COVID interruption,” he said.

The main focus will be the election, Taylor said, with plans to announce the winners within 24 to 48 hours after the meeting.

Below is a brief description of each candidate. More information can be found on the Daniel Island property owner’s association website at dicommunity.org/announcements/dina-board-election-announcement/.

President

Running for president are Doyle Hopper and Andrea Sullivan. Hopper is a retired steel executive. He notes that he started at the bottom of the organization and, after 29 years, retired as an executive with the company managing a facility with $500 million in revenue.

Sullivan has over 20 years of experience as an educational facilities planner in the K-12 public school arena, which includes intergovernmental relations, design and development, and working with stakeholders.

Vice President

Danielle Beer and Bob Michalak are the candidates for vice president. Beer has experience as an educator, in technology startups, and as a Realtor and real estate investor. Michalak has decades of experience practicing law in the construction and development fields, and has degrees in mechanical and chemical engineering.

Treasurer

Zach Hasseler and Kelly Stechmesser are seeking the treasurer position. Hasseler works as an executive at a health care company, oversees business operations for a local Fluor Corporation office, and has served as an officer on other boards and associations. Stechmesser, who is running for reelection as treasurer, has an accounting degree from Clemson and has lived on Daniel Island for 20 years.

Secretary

The two candidates interested in serving as DINA secretary are Debbie Geilfuss and Steve Sarkees. Geilfuss has lived on Daniel Island for 20 years and most recently worked at Bishop England as a bookkeeper, administrative assistant and business manager. Sarkees is a commissioned officer in the Coast Guard and is a graduate of the Charleston School of Law.

Questions can be directed to the current President Greg Taylor at DanielIslandNeighborhood@gmail.com or Kelly Stechmesser at kstechmesser@yahoo.com.

Top sports moments of the year

What were your top Daniel Island sports stories for 2021? Here’s one man’s opinion.Carlisle Cup: The Carlisle Cup, which is awarded to the state’s top five athletic programs from Class A to Class AAAAA, ended up at both Daniel Island schools, Philip Simmons and Bishop England, for the 2020-21 academic year.The Iron Horses won top honors in Class AA for the first time in the school’s history by claiming three state championships: boys’ tennis, girls’ track and field, and boys&...

What were your top Daniel Island sports stories for 2021? Here’s one man’s opinion.

Carlisle Cup: The Carlisle Cup, which is awarded to the state’s top five athletic programs from Class A to Class AAAAA, ended up at both Daniel Island schools, Philip Simmons and Bishop England, for the 2020-21 academic year.

The Iron Horses won top honors in Class AA for the first time in the school’s history by claiming three state championships: boys’ tennis, girls’ track and field, and boys’ track and field. The program had two state runner-up teams and claimed eight Region-6AA championships.

Bishop England was the top Class AAA program in the state. Bishop England has won the award every year since it was given out beginning with the 1999-2000 academic year. The Bishops earned state crowns in cross country, girls’ tennis, girls’ lacrosse and boys’ lacrosse.

Credit One tennis: Veronika Kudermetova is the answer.

The question is: Who was the last winner of the Volvo Car Open?

Kudermetova won the singles tournament in April and soon after, the tournament’s name was changed to the Credit One Charleston Open.

In July, Charleston Tennis, LLC unveiled Credit One Bank as the new title sponsor of the WTA event. The tournament is the largest women’s’-only tennis tournament in North America and will celebrate its 50th year April 2-10, 2022.

Fans will experience a newly renovated tennis facility in 2022 at the LTP Daniel Island tennis center, now called the Credit One Stadium.

Charleston Tennis, LLC, which manages the stadium under a lease from the City of Charleston, is nearing completion of a major renovation of the 20-year-old stadium.

Credit One Stadium will expand from 7,500 seats to 11,000 seats and feature 16 permanent suites, new concession stands, more bathrooms and a 75,000-square-foot Stage House with a partial roof.

Volvo Cars USA will continue to support tennis as the official vehicle of the WTA 500 event.

Philip Simmons Football: The Philip Simmons Iron Horses were in the news on a weekly basis as one of the state’s top football programs.

The team posted an 11-2 record and won the Region 6-AA championship with a 5-0 record.

The offense averaged 36 points per game, while the defense surrendered only 12.7. The Iron Horses landed eight players on the first team of the state coaches’ association’s all-state squad, while five players earned honorable mention.

BE Coaches: Bishop England had two of its legendary coaches in the news in 2021: Ed Khouri and Dave Snyder.

Khouri coaches boys’ soccer and picked up his 500th career victory in the spring. He was just the third BE coach to reach 500 career wins.

Khouri has built the boys’ program into an elite program. He has guided the teams to 17 all-time state titles, which is best in state history. Khouri was only the fifth coach in Palmetto State history to reach the milestone.

Meanwhile, Snyder, the longtime girls’ soccer coach, retired. He began his career at BE as the coach of the boys’ junior varsity soccer team and was named girls’ coach in 2003. He posted a 309-108-17 record from 2003-21, winning 10 state titles.

Emma Schimpf top athlete: Daniel Island resident Emma Schimpf was named the 2021 MaxPrep female athlete of the year in South Carolina. She was a golfer for the Oceanside Collegiate Academy girls’ golf team.

In 2021, Schimpf was 11-under-par for the two-day state tournament and beat runner-up Sydney Roberts of Chesnee by five strokes for the match, which was held at Hackler Course on the campus of Coastal Carolina University in Conway.

Schimpf’s biggest accomplishment at OCA was a state record at the Class AAA golf state championship in 2020 when she carded a two-day total of 133 to win medalist honors.

BE Lacrosse goes 18-0, streak at 64: The Bishop England girls’ lacrosse team had one of the greatest seasons ever in state history, topping Oceanside Collegiate Academy 25-2 to win its fifth straight state championship and finish with an 18-0 record.

The Bishops, who will begin the 2022 season with a 64-match win streak, outscored opponents 325-34 during the season, and in four playoff games, the Bishops averaged 21 points to the opponent’s one.

The Bishops have not lost a game since Charlotte Catholic defeated them in 2016.

State championships X2: Philip Simmons won girls and boys titles in two sports during 2021. The boys’ team captured another Class AA state championship in Class AA tennis, while the girls’ team won their first state championship to kick off the fall sports season.

The common factor? Coach Richard Schulz, who coaches both teams.

Meanwhile, the Iron Horse boys and girls both captured Class AA state titles in May. The boys’ team outscored Greer Middle College 99-67, while the girls easily defeated Woodland 161-60.

Noah Ward and NaJhyrai Watson who both turned in national elite efforts in distance and spring events, respectively. It marked the final high school meet for Ward, one of the top distance runners in state history.

Daniel Brooks: Bishop England’s Daniel Brooks was in the news for outstanding seasons in both basketball and baseball.

He was named all-state on both sports and considered entering the Major League Draft. However, the money wasn’t right and he’s attending the College of Charleston on a baseball scholarship.

Brooks led the Bishops with a .379 batting average and 34 RBI. He collected 25 hits in 66 at-bats with seven doubles and two home runs. He shone on the mound. He struck out 75 batters in 44 innings while walking only 15 with a 1.45 ERA.

BE football player gets perfect score: Matthew Fishburne plays football and track and field at Bishop England. He’s also an excellent student. He scored a perfect score, 36, on the ACT.

Less than half of 1% (0.334) of test takers each year record a perfect score. That equates to about 5,500 students an academic year – nationwide.

Fishburne has a 5.2 GPA on the Bishop England scale and has been ranked No. 6 in his class of 175 students the past two years.

PS sweeps BE: For the first time in Philip Simmons five-year history, both the boys’ and girls’ basketball teams beat Bishop England on Dec. 3 at Father O’Brien Gymnasium. A week later, both Iron Horse teams completed the sweep of the series in front of a packed

On Dec. 3, the Iron Horse boys used a smothering second-half defense to gain a 53-36 victory.

A week later the Iron Horses claimed a 56-43 home court victory.

The Iron Horse girls also swept Bishop England this season. On Dec. 3, the Iron Horse girls posted a 60-35 victory, its first ever victory against BE. A week later, they posted a 41-30 home court victory over BE.

Kylee Kellermann scored her 1,000th career point in the first victory over BE and tallied 23 points, with seven field goals and seven of 10 from the foul line in the second game.

‘Transit deserts’ remain as Charleston continues to grow

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As cars sped down Rivers Avenue past the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority’s North Charleston SuperStop, Roy Briggs sat outside, waiting for his bus to arrive.“They need more buses,” Briggs said. “This place is getting bigger.”The Lowcountry’s cities and suburbs have seen a sharp growth in population and development in recent years, with Census Bureau estimates showing a 23 percent increase in residents across the tri-county area over the last 10 year...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As cars sped down Rivers Avenue past the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority’s North Charleston SuperStop, Roy Briggs sat outside, waiting for his bus to arrive.

“They need more buses,” Briggs said. “This place is getting bigger.”

The Lowcountry’s cities and suburbs have seen a sharp growth in population and development in recent years, with Census Bureau estimates showing a 23 percent increase in residents across the tri-county area over the last 10 years.

From Daniel Island to Dorchester County, parts of the Charleston area that were once sparsely populated have become packed with new houses, apartments, and employment centers, leading to increased traffic on major thoroughfares like I-26 and two-lane highways such as Ashley River Road.

With the Lowcountry’s population continuing to surge, has the region’s public transit infrastructure kept up with the growth?

Daniel Island is filled with walkable neighborhoods, businesses along Seven Farms Drive, and sizable office buildings that are home to large employers such as Benefitfocus and Blackbaud.

Just a few decades ago, nearly all of the buildings that can now be found within this suburban section of the City of Charleston did not exist. Now, Daniel Island is one of Berkeley County’s most expensive areas to live, with I-526 serving as the primary way in and out.

However, despite Daniel Island’s transformation, the community remains a transit desert, with no CARTA or TriCounty Link buses that would allow people to commute to or from the opportunities that exist on the island.

“Transit desert is a technical term used to describe an area where you have a high demand for public transit but a low supply, or you don’t have any public transit supply at all in that region,” University of Texas at Austin Urban Information Lab Director Junfeng Jiao explained.

Jiao, who came up with the term “transit desert” nearly a decade ago, studies places across the United States where there is a lack of public transportation.

North Charleston sits just across the Cooper River from Daniel Island, with the Don Holt Bridge connecting the two, but if one does not have a car or cannot afford a taxi or rideshare service, traveling from one side of the river can be easier said than done. There is no sidewalk or bike lane on the bridge and no public buses travel over it.

“Not everybody can afford a car. Not everybody can drive a car. Not everybody is willing to drive a car,” Jiao said.

Daniel Island is far from the only part of the Charleston area that is not served by public transportation.

In North Charleston, Palmetto Commerce Parkway has become one of the Lowcountry’s primary centers for industrial jobs, with numerous warehouses and facilities for companies such as Mercedes-Benz, FedEx, and Boeing lining the road. However, much of the Palmetto Commerce Parkway corridor does not have bus service.

Getting to Charleston County’s coastal communities, where there are a number of large employers in the hospitality industry, is also an arduous task using public transportation.

“Most of the people don’t want to hire you if you got to use mass transit as your way of getting to work,” Briggs said.

CARTA’s 31 bus travels along Folly Road on James Island, but terminates more than two miles before downtown Folly Beach. At Kiawah Island, TriCounty Link’s C204 bus only travels as far as Freshfields Village, but does not reach the island itself. Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island also do not have daily mass transit service.

“If you don’t have a car, you cannot afford, or you cannot drive a car, your life depends on bus schedules, so you have to carefully plan out your day based on bus schedules,” Jiao said. “If you miss a bus or if the bus is coming late, your day is totally changed.”

In some areas of the Lowcountry where there are public buses, there are limitations as to when service is in operation.

CARTA’s XP3 bus, which connects the Dorchester Village Shopping Center at the southern edge of Summerville with downtown Charleston, does not operate on weekends.

On CARTA’s main routes between downtown Charleston and West Ashley, the last outbound bus on Sunday evenings leaves at 6:05 while the route along Coleman Boulevard in Mount Pleasant does not run on Sundays at all.

“We believe our service is actually running at the hours that demand dictates,” CARTA Chairman Mike Seekings said, adding that the agency needs to ensure that when they send buses to places, people are in fact utilizing them.

With more people moving to the Lowcountry on a daily basis, could changes be made to local transit systems?

“I think the region is finally sort of getting to a place where there’s recognition that transit is vital to the health of a community,” Charleston Moves Executive Director Katie Zimmerman said. “Transportation options affect everyone.”

Charleston Moves advocates for walkers, bikers, and transit riders in the Lowcountry, but Zimmerman said that improved public transportation would impact car drivers as well, potentially leading to fewer personal vehicles on the road.

“Since right now, we’re a state where the majority of trips are taken by motor vehicle, I would guess that what bothers people the most is sitting in traffic,” Zimmerman said. “If we can chip away at that, wouldn’t that be wonderful? Wouldn’t you be so happy to see fewer cars on the road?”

Zimmerman added that alleviating transit deserts would have positive environmental impacts and allow for reduced vehicle emissions, noting that “transportation is the largest source of climate changing emissions in our state at this point.”

“Even if you’re never going to get out of your car, you’re going to want to be involved and support these other modes of transit,” Zimmerman said.

The Lowcountry does not have commuter rail, light rail, or bus lanes, but over the last few years, some changes have been made to the region’s transit network.

“This summer, we ran what we consider to be a very successful pilot program going to Isle of Palms from Mount Pleasant,” Seekings said, referring to the Beach Reach shuttle that operated on weekends. “We had the oldest fleet of buses in America just four years ago. We’re in the process of [the] complete replacement of those.”

Another initiative, Lowcountry Rapid Transit, is expected to bring increased bus service that will run from downtown Charleston along the Rivers Avenue corridor to Ladson, but the project is not slated to be completed until 2026 and is no longer set to terminate in downtown Summerville.

“As the region grows, we’re going to grow with it,” Seekings said. “As with any agency, we do have funding limitations. We get funding sources from a number of different places, but those limitations are real. We put equipment on the road. We get it to the places that we know people need the service within our budget limitations. We don’t have an endless budget.”

“Recently the federal government has made a huge commitment to investing in regional and local public transportation and we expect CARTA to be the beneficiary of that,” Seekings added. “We’ll use those resources to make sure that the service goes to places that people need to go, where they’re going from, and we will look to expansion of services as our budget expands.”

With transit deserts such as Daniel Island remaining, do recent efforts go far enough to add local public transportation options?

“I would say the number one issue with why we don’t have the transit system we should is because we are not investing in it,” Zimmerman said. “The state invests very little in public transit in South Carolina and meanwhile at the same time, we’re investing literally billions trying to set aside for highway construction [and] highway widening.”

Zimmerman cited the South Carolina Department of Transportation’s proposed changes to I-526, which are estimated to cost $4 billion.

“If we as a community and as a state were willing to invest in transit the way apparently some agencies are willing to invest in highways, we would be doing a lot better,” Zimmerman said.

For a map of CARTA bus routes, click here. A map of TriCounty Link bus routes can be viewed here.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

BE athletics aid community over holiday break

The Bishop England High School athletic teams have been successful on the playing field throughout the years. If you need proof, just take a look at the number of times the Bishops have earned the Carlisle Cup, an award given annually to the top athletic programs in the state, based on enrollment classification. The Bishops have won the award every year since its inception in the 2002-03 academic year.But the Bishops have also fared well in arenas such as community service and that was evident during this holiday season. Three of the ...

The Bishop England High School athletic teams have been successful on the playing field throughout the years. If you need proof, just take a look at the number of times the Bishops have earned the Carlisle Cup, an award given annually to the top athletic programs in the state, based on enrollment classification. The Bishops have won the award every year since its inception in the 2002-03 academic year.

But the Bishops have also fared well in arenas such as community service and that was evident during this holiday season. Three of the school’s programs — baseball, wrestling and boys’ lacrosse — scored victories by helping those in need at Christmas time.

The baseball team, under coach Mike Darnell, served more than 100 families during the 2021 holiday season through the James Island Outreach.

Donica Dennis, a baseball mom, coordinated the service projects that helped collect about 400 pairs of socks, 65 blankets, 60 bottles of shampoo, 100 bars of soap, 75 tubes of toothpaste, 75 razors, more than 100 toothbrushes and countless amounts of food.

Meanwhile, the boys’ lacrosse team, coached by Tyler Tracy, worked together to help give a South Carolina family a special Christmas. Senior player Zach Skipper led the team’s service project with the Charleston Elves organization.

Thanks to team donations and the support of the school during two doughnut fundraisers, BE lacrosse was able to fulfill two children’s wish lists and give a family $700 in donations.

Finally, the wrestling team, coached by Paul Spence, helped the Lowcountry Food Bank by packing over 850 boxes of goods for senior citizens in the community.

Athletic Director Paul Runey said helping others allows the student-athletes to appreciate what they have.

“The more you teach the kids to give back to those less fortunate, the average kid will appreciate more what they do have,” Runey said. “We need to realize high school students can make a difference in other people’s lives.”

Darnell, the longtime BE baseball coach, said his teams have been involved in helping others during his tenure. The team’s outreach started with its connection to the Charleston Miracle League — a program that provides a life-changing experience for children and adults with mental and physical challenges — through a community supported baseball league.

Darnell said the baseball program gets behind projects that the players and families want to support and that was the case this year with the James Island Outreach.

“It’s easy to help people,” Darnell said. “We have proven you can help people with little effort. This is something we put together in very little time.

“It’s a matter of sending out an email telling everyone what we’re going to do and who we’re trying to help,” Darnell added. “Our people step up. They always do.”

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