Johns Island

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The Planet Green Tree Service Difference

At Planet Green Tree Service, we are firm believers that trees make the world a better place. They provide us with verdant beauty, cool shade, and emergency shelter. They raise our home values, add personality to our neighborhoods, and provide us with clean air to breathe. When your home or business has well-maintained, healthy trees, everyone benefits. That's why we are so passionate about providing our customers with dependable tree services in the Lowcountry.

We believe that honest prices, state-of-the-art equipment, friendly arborists, and good old-fashioned hard work are what set us apart from our competition. With more than 33 years of service in South Carolina, you can rest easy knowing every member of the Planet Green team is committed to the following:

  • Conduct themselves in a professional manner
  • Provide you with exemplary tree care services
  • Arrive at your home or business on time and ready to work
  • Provide you with affordable service rates
  • Meet or exceed our industry standards
  • Utilize the utmost safety when removing or maintaining your trees or shrubs
  • Have full insurance to protect themselves and your home

Our customers mean a lot to us, which is why we strive to provide them the best, most helpful customer service in our industry. When you hire our company to perform a tree service in cityname, know that we take this responsibility seriously and will always treat your home like we would treat our own. At Planet Green Tree Service, you won't ever have to worry about sneaky hidden fees or outrageous pricing. We believe every homeowner and business owner should have access to affordable tree services, which is why we set our rates at reasonable levels. Our job is to protect your home, your trees, and also your wallet!

Whether your home has overgrown trees that need trimming or you have an unsightly stump that needs grinding, our team of tree experts is here to help. Curious what kind of tree care work we provide to homeowners in South Carolina?

Planet Green specializes in the following areas:

Tree Trimming in Johns Island

Have you noticed your favorite tree growing in a strange shape? Are your trees or shrubs so overgrown that it's making your property and home look unkempt? Are the trees near your home weighed down by dangerous dead branches? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, it might be time to speak with a Planet Green Tree Service professional to find a solution.

Like anything that lives, trees respond to their environment. When trees are not properly maintained, they can cause a whole host of problems for the homeowner. Overgrowth doesn't just look bad - it can be a potential safety hazard and liability for your home. To prevent this from happening, it's crucial that your trees are trimmed and pruned regularly. Trimming your trees and shrubs gives your home a tidy, appealing look and facilitates healthy plant and tree growth.

Because every tree and shrub is different, you must approach tree trimming with a plan. Before you start hacking at your trees with a machete, be sure to contact Planet Green Tree Service. Our team of expert arborists will come to your home and determine the best path to take for your tree trimming needs. We always take into account variables like the strengths, weaknesses, and species of your trees.

 Large Tree Removal Johns Island, SC

Benefits of Tree Trimming in Johns Island

For some folks, tree trimming seems like a minor detail in the grand scheme of homeownership. It can be a tedious job, but keeping your trees trimmed and well-maintained is more important than you might think. Below are just a few of the many benefits of keeping your trees and shrubs trimmed:

Tree Trimming in Johns Island

Tree Health

Part of the Planet Green pruning and trimming process includes the removal of damaged, broken, dead, and diseased branches. When ignored, these dead or dying branches can cause harmful fungi to wreak havoc on the trees around your home or business. Removing these weakened branches helps prevent fungi and keeps your trees healthy. In addition, tree trimming also lets more sunlight and air circulation reach your trees, boosting overall health.

Safety

Safety

As longtime residents of South Carolina, we know how dangerous hurricanes and heavy storms can be. Strong winds from these natural occurrences can cause branches to fall or even be carried away with significant force. This is concerning for many homeowners, especially those who have trees lining their driveways, recreational areas, and walking paths. When you trust Planet Green with your trimming needs, you are actually doing your part to "storm proof" your home from hazardous tree-related accidents. If you have low-hanging branches close to your roof or business, pruning these trees can provide more safety and overhead clearance. That way, don't have an anxiety attack every time a storm rolls through your neighborhood.

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

Nobody likes the look of an overgrown, disheveled tree. Tree trimming improves the general appearance of your tree and makes your whole yard and home look better. Tree trimming also prevents your trees from growing weak branches and crotches and helps stop branches from intertwining with one another.

Developmental Tree Trimming

Developmental Tree Trimming

Pruning younger trees is key to protecting them as they age. This vital tree service in Johns Island keeps young trees aesthetically appealing and promotes proper structural integrity and optimal branch structure. In addition, as your home's landscape matures, taking the time to trim young trees reduces the chance of expensive problems like tree failure.

 Local Tree Service Johns Island, SC

Types of Tree Trimming

Not all tree trimming services from Planet Green Tree Service are the same. Our experts specialize in a number of different tree trimming services to ensure you are getting the right kind of trim for the appropriate situation. Because even the smallest mistake can permanently affect your tree's health, we approach every tree trimming job with surgeon-like precision. That way, you know your trees are in capable, responsible hands.

Crown Reduction

Crown Reduction

When your trees age without the proper kind of care, they can develop too many branches on their interior. Trees like this give great shade, but too much is not a good sign. That's where crown reduction trimming comes in. By reducing the density of your tree's crown, our tree care experts improve its growth rate and health. Crown density reduction also promotes a longer lifespan and a more beautiful appearance.

Deadwooding

Deadwooding

As the name implies, deadwooding involves the trimming of dead wood from your trees. Often required in urban and suburban areas, deadwooding a tree makes it look more attractive and livelier, while maintaining the health of your tree's trunk by removing rotted branches. This process also makes it safer for kids and other people who walk underneath or near your tree that may be harmed by rotting branches that fall. Other tree trimming services that Planet Green offers include: hazardous tree assessments, shrub trimming, pruning, cabling, bracing, and corrective trimming.

Stump Removal in Johns Island

For most property owners, removing a tree can seem like a major project. While that notion certainly isn't wrong, tree removal is more straightforward and often easier than trying to remove an unsightly stump from your yard. Have you ever wondered why you see so many yards with stumps dotted around the land? It's because they're very difficult to remove. That is why Planet Green Tree Service has been offering stump removal services in South Carolina for more than 33 years. Our skilled stump removal experts bring a wealth of knowledge and cutting-edge tools to every stump removal project they tackle.

The fact of the matter is this: trying to remove a stump on your own is an incredible undertaking. Going the "DIY" route can take weeks to complete, even if you spend an hour or two every day. There's also the issue of operating heavy machinery (which costs time and money to rent) and even light fires to expedite the process, which is dangerous. For these reasons alone, we always recommend that you bring in a professional to remove your tree stump safely and effectively.

 Tree Service Johns Island, SC

Benefits of Stump Removal in Johns Island

Better Looking Yard

Better Looking Yard

If you are a homeowner that loves sculpted hedges, beautiful landscaping, and a tidy law, removing old tree stumps will feel like a huge weight off of your chest. Stump removal not only gives your home more curb appeal, it can actually raise the value of your home. This is particularly pertinent if you are thinking about listing your home for sale in the near future.

More Space

More Space

If your yard is small, even one stump can reduce the amount of space you have in your yard. If you spend a lot of time playing sports or just enjoying your yard space, stump removal is a huge help. After all, nobody wants to toss a football around if there are a bunch of old stumps that you must avoid. Stumps also take up considerable space below ground, with their complicated root systems. Stump removal will give you and your family more room to plant flowers, grow vegetables, install a water feature, and much more.

Eliminate Unwanted Growth

Eliminate Unwanted Growth

When you leave a tree stump in your yard, you could be setting yourself up for unwanted tree growth. This kind of new growth often results in clusters of small trees popping up around the base of the stump. This problem isn't just unsightly; it can be harmful to any plants near the stump because the new trees will suck up all the water and nutrients out of your soil.

Pest Prevention

Pest Prevention

Tree stumps are notorious for harboring all sorts of pests that can damage your hard and cause expensive problems in your home. We're talking wood borers, ants, termites, and beetles. If you want to do away with these pests and protect your home, the best course of action is to contact Planet Green Tree Service for a quote on our professional tree removal services.

 Tree Removal Johns Island, SC

Reduce Headaches

Sure, you could take the time to do your research on how to remove a stump. You could go to Home Depot, rent a high-powered stump grinder, and risk your health trying to operate it without training. You could spend every winking moment of your free time trying to grind the stump down so you can remove it from your yard. But why go through all that trouble when a trustworthy, experienced stump removal company like Planet Green Tree Service is only a phone call away?

Our team of stump removal professionals uses state-of-the-art tools designed to keep your property damage-free during the removal process. We will turn your yard into a beautiful blank slate, so you can focus on enjoying your stump-free while we haul away all the debris.

 Tree Pruning Johns Island, SC

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With 33 years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina locals choose Planet Green Tree Service for tree trimming and stump removal in their city. Clients love us because we believe in exceeding your expectations, no matter how large or small a job is.

  • Conduct themselves in a professional manner
  • Provide you with exemplary tree care services
  • Arrive at your home or business on time and ready to work
  • Provide you with affordable service rates

Contact our office to learn more about our tree services in South Carolina or to schedule your free quote today!

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Sea Island Habitat for Humanity struggling with rising costs

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Since 1978, for more than four decades, the Sea Island Habitat for Humanity has been a mainstay in the Lowcountry.Three hundred seventy-six homes were built for those struggling with finances.That work continues with seven total homes planned for 2022, and hopefully another nine for 2023.Despite a successful track record, not everything goes perfectly for the non-profit."I think the biggest factor w...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Since 1978, for more than four decades, the Sea Island Habitat for Humanity has been a mainstay in the Lowcountry.

Three hundred seventy-six homes were built for those struggling with finances.

That work continues with seven total homes planned for 2022, and hopefully another nine for 2023.

Despite a successful track record, not everything goes perfectly for the non-profit.

"I think the biggest factor we face is an infrastructure challenge," says John Rhoden, the organization's Executive Director.

Rhoden has noticed some spots in recent years are tougher to build on due to a lack of a sewage system.

The Town of Hollywood unfortunately is one of those places.

It can be costly to build close to where the sewer lines are.

The Town's Planning director, Roy DeHaven, tells us, "The issue seems to be the distance from the gravity sewer lines. Most of the properties close to the sewer lines are very expensive on the land cost."

However, DeHaven says the town is working with Habitat to deal with some of those troubles.

Rhoden understands the difficulties.

"Perfect world in our scenario, I think we would have more sewer systems in place. And that's not a quick fix."

Other issues include property value costs.

Rhoden says, "As we are finding land so expensive and so hard to get on James Island, Johns Island, we're moving further and further away from Charleston."

But Habitat has two communities, Hollywood and Ravenel, who welcome the non-profit and both say they have a great working relationship with Habitat.

However, other obstacles have plagued the non-profit in recent years; most notably, Covid.

During the pandemic's height, around half of the home builds had to stop due to a volunteer shortage.

Good news- the volunteers are back in near pre-Covid numbers, allowing planned projects to resume while taking on new ones.

The Roof Repair Rally is a fundraiser to help the Sea Islands Habitat for Humanity fix up non-Habitat homes' roofs.

Last year, 31 were fixed for people dealing with income crisis. This year, they aim to match that. But, they need donations to pull the plan off.

Which SC beach is the safest with the least pollution? The most unsafe? Take a look

Last year, Environment America, a federation of environmental advocacy organizations, ranked the most unsafe beaches in the country based on tests run in 2020.That year, a total of 23 beaches were tested for fecal indicator bacteria in the state of South Carolina.Out of four tested counties in South Carolina, t...

Last year, Environment America, a federation of environmental advocacy organizations, ranked the most unsafe beaches in the country based on tests run in 2020.

That year, a total of 23 beaches were tested for fecal indicator bacteria in the state of South Carolina.

Out of four tested counties in South Carolina, the average percentage of potentially unsafe days in South Carolina by county in 2020 ranked Beaufort County as the second safest.

The four South Carolina counties that were tested were Horry, Charleston, Beaufort and Georgetown counties.

The scoring left Beaufort County with a 12% average number of days with potentially unsafe water for beaches in the county.

Comparatively, Horry County, which contains Myrtle Beach, scored a 34% average for potentially unsafe water for beach days.

Not a title to brag about, South Carolina’s own Myrtle Beach scored number one in the state for the most potentially unsafe swimming days in 2020. The testing conducted in Myrtle Beach resulted in potentially unsafe water 84% of the days tested. This average was a result of 70 potentially unsafe days out of 82 testing days.

Contrarily, North Myrtle Beach scored considerably better than its slightly southern counterpart, coming in at 34%, indicating 29 potentially unsafe days out of 87 testing days.

“While we were not able to pinpoint pollution sources for any particular beach, sewage overflows, stormwater runoff, and manure from factory farms, all contain fecal bacteria,” said John Rumpler, the clean water program director at Environment America.

Hilton Head Island tied for the safest number of days along with Isle of Palms and Seabrook Island, both in Charleston County, with a 20% indicator of potentially unsafe days. This comes from two potentially unsafe days out of 10 testing days.

This comes as no surprise as in 2019, Environment America ranked Beaufort County as a clean beach area yet again. In the study, 28 beaches in Beaufort County were tested, and only seven of those had even one “potentially unsafe” day, the report said.

Each beach in the county was tested for 10 or 11 days. Four of the seven beaches were on Hilton Head Island; two were on Harbor Island; one was on Hunting Island, according to a previous Island Packet report.

As for the 2020 report released last year, Myrtle Beach’s reported 84% of potentially unsafe days was one of the biggest percentages in the study, but not the highest overall in the U.S.

Cole Park in Nueces County, Texas scored a 91% average of potentially unsafe days, being broken down by 62 potentially unsafe days in 2020 out of 68 testing days.

Nye Beach in Lincoln County, Oregon scored a 90% average with nine potentially unsafe days out of 10 different testing days.

This story was originally published September 2, 2022 5:00 AM.

'Champion for Hispanic heritage' embraces diversity, equity and inclusion efforts at MUSC

When public health scientist Hermes Florez, M.D., Ph.D., decided to move from Miami, where Latinos are the majority, to Charleston, where they make up a much smaller percentage of the population, some friends were surprised.“A lot of my former mentors said, ‘Are you sure that that's the right move for you? And I said, ‘Why not? It's a great opportunity.’ There are a lot of misconceptions about the de...

When public health scientist Hermes Florez, M.D., Ph.D., decided to move from Miami, where Latinos are the majority, to Charleston, where they make up a much smaller percentage of the population, some friends were surprised.

“A lot of my former mentors said, ‘Are you sure that that's the right move for you? And I said, ‘Why not? It's a great opportunity.’ There are a lot of misconceptions about the deep South. I realized that Charleston is quite diverse and you really can embrace those values.”

Florez, born in Venezuela, is proud to be part of that diversity. “I am very honored to be a champion for Hispanic heritage,” he said, as the nation prepared to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Florez brings that sensibility to his role as chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, where he works to improve the health of people of all backgrounds.

“I fully embrace diversity, equity and inclusion in the Department of Public Health Sciences and the College of Medicine’s initiatives. I’ve had the opportunity to address some of the challenges that the Hispanic community has for access to care with my work at the free medical clinic on Johns Island and for the prevention and management of diseases that are more prevalent in Hispanics such as obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.”

Florez, an endocrinologist, volunteers at the Barrier Islands Free Medical Clinic on Fridays. He also sees patients at the Ralph H. Johnson Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. That’s on top of his busy schedule leading the public health sciences department, where he has overseen important changes during his first two years.

“The department has stepped up to the plate to fulfill its academic mission. We have gone through the accreditation of our public health program, national accreditation with the Council of Education for Public Health. We have also improved in our ranking on NIH funding,” Florez said, referring to the National Institutes of Health. The NIH funds research through grants to institutions such as MUSC.

“We moved from No. 20 in public health funding from the NIH nationwide to No. 16. That’s a great team effort. I'm not taking credit except that I'm a cheerleader I promote and provide any resources that we have at the chair's office.”

He’s currently waiting to hear if the NIH will fund a proposal to enhance MUSC’s recruitment of minority faculty in biomedical research. “This is going to be a $10 million of energy investment for our faculty across all the colleges. This was an initiative with all the deans expressing support for great research team from different clusters,” Florez said.

“We have the cancer and inflammation. We have the aging and neuroscience. We have cardio metabolic health, and also the population health and data science, unique strengths that we have in MUSC. And I was blessed to be part of the team leading the efforts for a successful submission. So hopefully in a few months, we'll see the response. But I said to the team, regardless of whether we get the funding, I'm willing to invest $1 million on my chair package toward that.”

Florez is also trying to get young more people from minority groups interested in public health science. “We go to the high schools here. You go to the community. You incentivize them. You say, you have the opportunity to participate in topnotch research at MUSC and obviously with other academic partners across the state then you sort of nurture them through college, and then eventually they will come hopefully to any of these colleges in MUSC and maybe do graduate studies, postgraduate training, and then the pipeline for minority faculty. And then we have the critical mass.”

Florez said his department is already expanding its programs, preparing to offer a master of public health degree online and a certificate in population health. “Those are among the ways to address the needs of the workforce training in South Carolina and beyond.”

Public health science involves preventing diseases, helping people live longer and improving health by addressing environmental threats. It uses a combination of epidemiology, biostatistics and health services to achieve those goals. Florez has a strategy to bring together more experts in those areas. “We're building the team, addressing the needs on environmental health and all these different omics: genomics, metabolomics, you name it.”

As he builds that team, he’s leading by example. “It is important to give the opportunity to minority faculty, staff, students and community partners to appreciate that one of their own, in this case a Hispanic public health physician scientist, can respond to the call to serve as a leader.”

MUSC’s new chair of public health sciences is honored to appear on national list of inspiring Hispanic/Latinx scientists.

Chimney Cove residents on Hilton Head who got eviction notices told they can stay — for now

Residents of Chimney Cove Village, a low-income apartment complex on Hilton Head Island, will not be evicted this month as planned, according to a letter they received from management.The eviction notices they received Aug. 12 have been rescinded and their leases will continue, at least for now. Most resident were given 30 days notice, meaning they had until Sept. 12 to move.Sandy Gillis of the Deep Well Project, a nonprofit group that provides food and housing aid to islanders in need, said residents informed her of new notice...

Residents of Chimney Cove Village, a low-income apartment complex on Hilton Head Island, will not be evicted this month as planned, according to a letter they received from management.

The eviction notices they received Aug. 12 have been rescinded and their leases will continue, at least for now. Most resident were given 30 days notice, meaning they had until Sept. 12 to move.

Sandy Gillis of the Deep Well Project, a nonprofit group that provides food and housing aid to islanders in need, said residents informed her of new notices from property manager John Sinadinos taped to their doors around 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

“Please be advised that the notices of termination you received earlier this month are hereby rescinded,” the notices read. “Your leases continue in full force and effect.”

“We are currently working out the details, I can provide a better update soon,” Sandy Johal, who owns Chimney Cove along with her husband Sam, told The Island Packet. She had no further comment.

The letters distributed to residents were printed in English and Spanish. The Aug. 12 eviction notices were printed only in English, despite many of Chimney Cove’s roughly 300 tenants being native Spanish speakers. Many complained that they were not given enough notice to move out and had no where else to go.

Residents are still required to pay September rent, despite previously being told they wouldn’t have to pay for the month, Gillis said.

The Rev. June Wilkins, pastor of the Christ Lutheran Church neighboring Chimney Cove, said she doesn’t want to see tenants “jerked around” by management.

Residents have received no information on whether the sale of the property that prompted the original eviction notices has been postponed or scrapped entirely, Wilkins said. Questions remain on whether the reprieve is temporary or if residents should continue looking for other housing.

After the original eviction notices were posted, Gillis and Wilkins created a fund to help tenants of Chimney Cove find housing. The Town of Hilton Head have called a special town council meeting on Sept. 6 to address the sudden evictions and brainstorm solutions with organizations and community leaders.

The town has been “monitoring the situation” and acknowledged the impact displacing Chimney Cove’s tenants would have on affordable housing across the island. Chimney Cove has served as a low-income housing complex since 1973, and losing any housing for working islanders would further strain their already limited options.

When the Johals originally purchased the property in 2016, they evicted the tenants to make room for seasonal workers from Jamaica who traveled with H-2B visas, permitting them to work temporary, non-agricultural jobs in the U.S.

Losing Chimney Cove would be especially challenging since the town’s North End workforce housing development won’t begin construction until 2023.

Lower home prices were identified as a critical need as early as 2018, when the town completed an assessment of housing options on Hilton Head. At the time, the two fastest-growing income brackets on the island were those who made more than $150,000 a year and those who made less than $25,000.

“Higher-income households can put upward pressure on prices and rents, putting housing further out of reach for those with more modest incomes,” the report read.

This story was originally published September 1, 2022 11:41 AM.

My Charleston Weekend: Goodbye summer

This Labor Day weekend is full of exciting concerts, dances and the outdoors. Check out the Lowcountry Jazz Festival, shag on Edisto, and enjoy concerts at Johns Island County Park and at The Joe to say goodbye to summer.Toast Under the OaksCelebrate the end of summer under the oaks at Johns Island County Park. Enjoy live music and food trucks on Sept. 1 and 15 from 5-7 p.m. This week’s performer is Charleston local Grace Trice, and food is provided by Kees Kitchen and Mac Daddy. No outside food and drinks are allowed, ...

This Labor Day weekend is full of exciting concerts, dances and the outdoors. Check out the Lowcountry Jazz Festival, shag on Edisto, and enjoy concerts at Johns Island County Park and at The Joe to say goodbye to summer.

Toast Under the Oaks

Celebrate the end of summer under the oaks at Johns Island County Park. Enjoy live music and food trucks on Sept. 1 and 15 from 5-7 p.m. This week’s performer is Charleston local Grace Trice, and food is provided by Kees Kitchen and Mac Daddy. No outside food and drinks are allowed, but leashed dogs are; guests are encouraged to bring chairs and tables. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door.

To purchase tickets online, go to bit.ly/3wERBrU.

Lowcountry Jazz Festival

Come out to the Charleston Gaillard Center and listen to stellar jazz performances while helping raise money for a good cause. From Sept. 2-4, proceeds from the Jazz Festival will go to Closing the Gap in Health Care Inc. and the Thaddeus John Bell, M.D. Endowment Fund for students pursuing a career in health science. The festival starts with a white party on Sept. 2 at the Gaillard’s Center Grand Ballroom followed by two days of smooth jazz on Sept. 3-4. Performers include Robert Glasper, Norman Brown and Marcus Miller, among others.

Tickets for the festival start at $68 plus fees, and white party tickets must be purchased separately. To purchase tickets for the event, go to bit.ly/3Tuoodd.

Shag Festival

Shag the day away at the Edisto Beach Shag Festival. From Sept. 2-4 listen to some of the top beach bands, watch the best shaggers in the Southeast show off their skills, shop arts and craft vendors, get a shag lesson and more at Bay Creek Park on Edisto. Daily entrance costs $15, or you can get a weekend pass for $40.

To view the events happening each day as well as the hours, go to bit.ly/3AWzOzd. To purchase tickets online, visit bit.ly/3PYXyqr.

Labor Day concert

The city of Charleston is making up for it’s canceled Fourth of July celebration with a special free-to-attend Labor Day concert featuring the Charleston Symphony at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park. Gates open at 6 p.m. Sept. 5, and the symphony starts at 8 p.m. Stick around after the music for food and a free fireworks show.

While the event is free, advanced reservations are needed. You can book them at bit.ly/3TpvijP.

Tuffy the Tiger

If you’re looking for a free family event, head over to the Flowertown Players the first Saturday of each month through February for Tuffy the Tiger. The live action puppet-based performances encourage positive life lessons through the use of the orange Tuffy the Tiger.

The performances are 30 minutes; afterward, children can make their own puppets and have a chance to meet Tuffy. Showtime is at 11 a.m. and reservations can be made at flowertownplayers.org/services-4.

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