North Charleston

Best Tree Service in North Charleston

Ask Us Anything!

843-300-9476

Quick Quote

The Planet Green Tree Service Difference

At Planet Green Tree Service, we are firm believers that trees make the world a better place. They provide us with verdant beauty, cool shade, and emergency shelter. They raise our home values, add personality to our neighborhoods, and provide us with clean air to breathe. When your home or business has well-maintained, healthy trees, everyone benefits. That's why we are so passionate about providing our customers with dependable tree services in the Lowcountry.

We believe that honest prices, state-of-the-art equipment, friendly arborists, and good old-fashioned hard work are what set us apart from our competition. With more than 33 years of service in South Carolina, you can rest easy knowing every member of the Planet Green team is committed to the following:

  • Conduct themselves in a professional manner
  • Provide you with exemplary tree care services
  • Arrive at your home or business on time and ready to work
  • Provide you with affordable service rates
  • Meet or exceed our industry standards
  • Utilize the utmost safety when removing or maintaining your trees or shrubs
  • Have full insurance to protect themselves and your home

Our customers mean a lot to us, which is why we strive to provide them the best, most helpful customer service in our industry. When you hire our company to perform a tree service in cityname, know that we take this responsibility seriously and will always treat your home like we would treat our own. At Planet Green Tree Service, you won't ever have to worry about sneaky hidden fees or outrageous pricing. We believe every homeowner and business owner should have access to affordable tree services, which is why we set our rates at reasonable levels. Our job is to protect your home, your trees, and also your wallet!

Whether your home has overgrown trees that need trimming or you have an unsightly stump that needs grinding, our team of tree experts is here to help. Curious what kind of tree care work we provide to homeowners in South Carolina?

Planet Green specializes in the following areas:

Tree Trimming in North Charleston

Have you noticed your favorite tree growing in a strange shape? Are your trees or shrubs so overgrown that it's making your property and home look unkempt? Are the trees near your home weighed down by dangerous dead branches? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, it might be time to speak with a Planet Green Tree Service professional to find a solution.

Like anything that lives, trees respond to their environment. When trees are not properly maintained, they can cause a whole host of problems for the homeowner. Overgrowth doesn't just look bad - it can be a potential safety hazard and liability for your home. To prevent this from happening, it's crucial that your trees are trimmed and pruned regularly. Trimming your trees and shrubs gives your home a tidy, appealing look and facilitates healthy plant and tree growth.

Because every tree and shrub is different, you must approach tree trimming with a plan. Before you start hacking at your trees with a machete, be sure to contact Planet Green Tree Service. Our team of expert arborists will come to your home and determine the best path to take for your tree trimming needs. We always take into account variables like the strengths, weaknesses, and species of your trees.

 Large Tree Removal North Charleston, SC

Benefits of Tree Trimming in North Charleston

For some folks, tree trimming seems like a minor detail in the grand scheme of homeownership. It can be a tedious job, but keeping your trees trimmed and well-maintained is more important than you might think. Below are just a few of the many benefits of keeping your trees and shrubs trimmed:

Tree Trimming in North Charleston

Tree Health

Part of the Planet Green pruning and trimming process includes the removal of damaged, broken, dead, and diseased branches. When ignored, these dead or dying branches can cause harmful fungi to wreak havoc on the trees around your home or business. Removing these weakened branches helps prevent fungi and keeps your trees healthy. In addition, tree trimming also lets more sunlight and air circulation reach your trees, boosting overall health.

Safety

Safety

As longtime residents of South Carolina, we know how dangerous hurricanes and heavy storms can be. Strong winds from these natural occurrences can cause branches to fall or even be carried away with significant force. This is concerning for many homeowners, especially those who have trees lining their driveways, recreational areas, and walking paths. When you trust Planet Green with your trimming needs, you are actually doing your part to "storm proof" your home from hazardous tree-related accidents. If you have low-hanging branches close to your roof or business, pruning these trees can provide more safety and overhead clearance. That way, don't have an anxiety attack every time a storm rolls through your neighborhood.

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

Nobody likes the look of an overgrown, disheveled tree. Tree trimming improves the general appearance of your tree and makes your whole yard and home look better. Tree trimming also prevents your trees from growing weak branches and crotches and helps stop branches from intertwining with one another.

Developmental Tree Trimming

Developmental Tree Trimming

Pruning younger trees is key to protecting them as they age. This vital tree service in North Charleston keeps young trees aesthetically appealing and promotes proper structural integrity and optimal branch structure. In addition, as your home's landscape matures, taking the time to trim young trees reduces the chance of expensive problems like tree failure.

 Local Tree Service North Charleston, SC

Types of Tree Trimming

Not all tree trimming services from Planet Green Tree Service are the same. Our experts specialize in a number of different tree trimming services to ensure you are getting the right kind of trim for the appropriate situation. Because even the smallest mistake can permanently affect your tree's health, we approach every tree trimming job with surgeon-like precision. That way, you know your trees are in capable, responsible hands.

Crown Reduction

Crown Reduction

When your trees age without the proper kind of care, they can develop too many branches on their interior. Trees like this give great shade, but too much is not a good sign. That's where crown reduction trimming comes in. By reducing the density of your tree's crown, our tree care experts improve its growth rate and health. Crown density reduction also promotes a longer lifespan and a more beautiful appearance.

Deadwooding

Deadwooding

As the name implies, deadwooding involves the trimming of dead wood from your trees. Often required in urban and suburban areas, deadwooding a tree makes it look more attractive and livelier, while maintaining the health of your tree's trunk by removing rotted branches. This process also makes it safer for kids and other people who walk underneath or near your tree that may be harmed by rotting branches that fall. Other tree trimming services that Planet Green offers include: hazardous tree assessments, shrub trimming, pruning, cabling, bracing, and corrective trimming.

Stump Removal in North Charleston

For most property owners, removing a tree can seem like a major project. While that notion certainly isn't wrong, tree removal is more straightforward and often easier than trying to remove an unsightly stump from your yard. Have you ever wondered why you see so many yards with stumps dotted around the land? It's because they're very difficult to remove. That is why Planet Green Tree Service has been offering stump removal services in South Carolina for more than 33 years. Our skilled stump removal experts bring a wealth of knowledge and cutting-edge tools to every stump removal project they tackle.

The fact of the matter is this: trying to remove a stump on your own is an incredible undertaking. Going the "DIY" route can take weeks to complete, even if you spend an hour or two every day. There's also the issue of operating heavy machinery (which costs time and money to rent) and even light fires to expedite the process, which is dangerous. For these reasons alone, we always recommend that you bring in a professional to remove your tree stump safely and effectively.

 Tree Service North Charleston, SC

Benefits of Stump Removal in North Charleston

Better Looking Yard

Better Looking Yard

If you are a homeowner that loves sculpted hedges, beautiful landscaping, and a tidy law, removing old tree stumps will feel like a huge weight off of your chest. Stump removal not only gives your home more curb appeal, it can actually raise the value of your home. This is particularly pertinent if you are thinking about listing your home for sale in the near future.

More Space

More Space

If your yard is small, even one stump can reduce the amount of space you have in your yard. If you spend a lot of time playing sports or just enjoying your yard space, stump removal is a huge help. After all, nobody wants to toss a football around if there are a bunch of old stumps that you must avoid. Stumps also take up considerable space below ground, with their complicated root systems. Stump removal will give you and your family more room to plant flowers, grow vegetables, install a water feature, and much more.

Eliminate Unwanted Growth

Eliminate Unwanted Growth

When you leave a tree stump in your yard, you could be setting yourself up for unwanted tree growth. This kind of new growth often results in clusters of small trees popping up around the base of the stump. This problem isn't just unsightly; it can be harmful to any plants near the stump because the new trees will suck up all the water and nutrients out of your soil.

Pest Prevention

Pest Prevention

Tree stumps are notorious for harboring all sorts of pests that can damage your hard and cause expensive problems in your home. We're talking wood borers, ants, termites, and beetles. If you want to do away with these pests and protect your home, the best course of action is to contact Planet Green Tree Service for a quote on our professional tree removal services.

 Tree Removal North Charleston, SC

Reduce Headaches

Sure, you could take the time to do your research on how to remove a stump. You could go to Home Depot, rent a high-powered stump grinder, and risk your health trying to operate it without training. You could spend every winking moment of your free time trying to grind the stump down so you can remove it from your yard. But why go through all that trouble when a trustworthy, experienced stump removal company like Planet Green Tree Service is only a phone call away?

Our team of stump removal professionals uses state-of-the-art tools designed to keep your property damage-free during the removal process. We will turn your yard into a beautiful blank slate, so you can focus on enjoying your stump-free while we haul away all the debris.

 Tree Pruning North Charleston, SC

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With 33 years of experience, it's no wonder why so many South Carolina locals choose Planet Green Tree Service for tree trimming and stump removal in their city. Clients love us because we believe in exceeding your expectations, no matter how large or small a job is.

  • Conduct themselves in a professional manner
  • Provide you with exemplary tree care services
  • Arrive at your home or business on time and ready to work
  • Provide you with affordable service rates

Contact our office to learn more about our tree services in South Carolina or to schedule your free quote today!

Latest News in North Charleston, SC

Editorial: North Charleston should rise to the challenge on old Naval Base

The city of North Charleston has a long and convoluted history grappling with the vast property that the Navy left behind when it closed its base and shipyard along the Cooper River a generation ago. But the city has an opportunity to write a promising new chapter soon, as it prepares to oversee development of new infill housing just west of the base’s historic officers’ quarters.This city project, which has been in the planning stages for years, is expected to see movement soon, as the many puzzle pieces of redeveloping t...

The city of North Charleston has a long and convoluted history grappling with the vast property that the Navy left behind when it closed its base and shipyard along the Cooper River a generation ago. But the city has an opportunity to write a promising new chapter soon, as it prepares to oversee development of new infill housing just west of the base’s historic officers’ quarters.

This city project, which has been in the planning stages for years, is expected to see movement soon, as the many puzzle pieces of redeveloping the former base finally fall into place.

The Navy left a vast amount of property. The southern end now is occupied by the Hugh K. Leatherman Terminal and federal offices, a series of piers and drydocks along the river that are home to assorted industrial uses, and a large swath just to the west being developed as an intermodal railyard to handle containers coming from and going to the Leatherman terminal.

But the jewel of the base always has been its northern end, particularly the officers’ quarters nestled amid a series of rolling hills shaded by dozens of mature, moss-draped trees. This unusually bucolic enclave is a reminder that Charleston had hired the Olmstead Brothers in the 19th century to make the area, once Retreat Plantation, into a vast new park, not unlike what the landscape firm’s namesake had helped do with New York’s Central Park a few decades before. It is here, amid a series of architecturally and historically significant buildings, that North Charleston plans a site for new housing.

We agree that some additional new homes would be an appropriate fit here. We also agree with the city’s vision of having these homes — and the residential portion of the district — gradually feather into the grander historic homes closer to Riverfront Park that have been (or eventually will be) renovated for more commercial, hospitality uses such as restaurants, event spaces and small lodging.

Ensuring that new housing is designed and built in a way that complements the officers’ quarters will be key. The city is on the right track with its infill goal — the officers’ quarters could benefit from additional housing, provided the density, height, quality of materials and design are right. The city should work with the broader community to make sure they are.

North Charleston currently has no architectural review board but plans to create one as part of this project. We not only urge city leaders to follow through on that, but we also urge the public to participate when the time comes.

Doing so might add cost and time, but it could make the difference between a successful project and something less. And it’s not just a question of ensuring suitable architectural design. The new housing should keep the open, park-like setting, so any type of fencing should be a no-go.

The Charleston Naval Yard Hospital Quarters Historic District, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, runs west to Hobson Street. Most of the infill is expected in the area just west of that, along Manley Avenue. The city already has razed a handful of 1970s housing structures there to clear the site. The vision, though, would add more homes in the district itself. Again, arriving at just the right number, height and placement will be crucial to maintaining the ambiance.

Charleston’s preservation community has been involved in the base, particularly regarding damage done recently to the hospital historic district. Some of its buildings were lost during construction of a new rail line extending north from the planned intermodal yard, and the state and preservation groups have largely agreed on how that damage should be mitigated.

Building infill on the base’s historic officers’ quarters is a separate issue from that mitigation, but these groups’ experience in advocating for suitable, contextual development in historic Charleston can help North Charleston get its plan right.

“We urge the city of North Charleston to see the proximity of this new housing to an important National Register district as something that adds value to the plan,” Preservation Society Director Brian Turner tells us, “and we hope this is an opportunity to increase public knowledge and awareness of the significance of the landscape.”

Indeed, an ideal project here should not only add new homes and value to North Charleston’s tax base, but also help residents and visitors grow in their appreciation for the landscape and its significant history first as a plantation, then as a short-lived city park and finally as a place where some of the highest-ranking members of the Navy lived during their time in our community.

We don’t have all the answers on how to make that happen, but we are confident that the more the city engages the public — and incorporates that feedback — the better the outcome will be.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Football Wrap: Fort Dorchester, Pinewood Prep put up 40

In gridiron action Sept. 16, one local team got back on track, another won its second straight game and a third suffered its first loss of the season.After suffering losses the past two weeks, Fort Dorchester earned a 48-6 win at Berkeley to improve to 2-2 on the season. Berkeley fell to 1-4.The Patriots’ defense yielded only one score for the second time this season. It also scored as linebacker Keshaun Seabrook forced a Berkeley fumble that defensive end Peyton McMichael picked up and returned into the end zone for a to...

In gridiron action Sept. 16, one local team got back on track, another won its second straight game and a third suffered its first loss of the season.

After suffering losses the past two weeks, Fort Dorchester earned a 48-6 win at Berkeley to improve to 2-2 on the season. Berkeley fell to 1-4.

The Patriots’ defense yielded only one score for the second time this season. It also scored as linebacker Keshaun Seabrook forced a Berkeley fumble that defensive end Peyton McMichael picked up and returned into the end zone for a touchdown.

Meanwhile the Fort offense doubled the points it scored during its first win. Quarterback Zolten Osborne did not play due to an injury he suffered last Friday night but senior receiver Tre Ryan stepped in at QB and did a good job leading the Patriots to victory. Running backs Davion Brown and Zion Reynolds also made big contributions including scores.

Next up for Fort Dorchester is a trip to Columbia to face defending Class AAAAA state champion Gaffney Sept. 23.

Pinewood Prep

The Panthers of Pinewood Prep kept the momentum they gained last week going and rolled to a 40-26 win over visiting John Paul II Sept. 16. The Panthers improved to 2-3 and both wins are region wins.

The first half was tight, but Pinewood outscored the Golden Warriors 19-6 in the second half. Pinewood rushed for 231 yards and four touchdowns while passing for 230 and two TDs.

Senior Ethan Timmons led the Panthers’ rushers with 191 yards and three TDs on 28 carries. Quarterback Asa Windham rushed for 15 yards and a TD and completed 10 of 16 pass attempts for 152 yards and a TD. Quarterback Harrison Weston completed 3 of 5 pass attempts for 78 yards and a TD.

Junior Troy Dandridge led the Pinewood receivers with three receptions for 84 yards and a TD. Seniors Sam Rowland and Noah Kessler both made two catches for 53 yards. One of Kessler’s receptions was a touchdown grab. Senior Shane DaRe finished with 46 all-purpose yards.

The Panthers have a bye week and then travel to play Pee Dee Academy Sept. 30.

Summerville

During the first three weeks of the season, Summerville outscored its opponents 106-13. However, the Green Wave lost 16-0 at Sumter Sept. 16. Sumter improved to 5-0 with the win.

Summerville gave up one rushing TD, one passing TD and a safety. Up next for the Green Wave is a trip to Goose Creek Sept. 23 to take on the Gators.

How one store in North Charleston left many without furniture or refunds

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — How long would you wait for that the right new sofa or kitchen table? Some customers of a North Charleston furniture store say they’ve been waiting for two years now and claim they’re getting the runaround.ABC News 4 received multiple reports directly to our newsroom of this, and one we found was Goose Cree...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — How long would you wait for that the right new sofa or kitchen table? Some customers of a North Charleston furniture store say they’ve been waiting for two years now and claim they’re getting the runaround.

ABC News 4 received multiple reports directly to our newsroom of this, and one we found was Goose Creek mother and daughter Brittany and Shelby Fox.

“We're gonna tell the story start to finish, and you know, just cut out the nonsense,” Brittany Fox said.

On January 15, 2021, the Foxes bought a new dresser online from Home Décor Outlets from its North Charleston location. But the process of getting the furniture to their doorstep took longer than they expected.

“They told me after the first [of February] that it would get delivered. It never came,” Shelby said. “There was one contact where they said something about there was going to be a delay with the dresser could be up to six months.”

So, the mother and daughter waited. And waited.

“I have to chase them,” Shelby said. Then waited some more.

“It was just dead silence from there,” Brittany said.

Now, almost two years later – they still have nothing. They said there was one constant throughout the process: “The runaround was consistent.”

No furniture or money received by the family. Besides the receipt they have from their purchase, the only thing they say they actually got from Home Décor Outlets: Ads.

“[They were] trying to sell me a mattress,” Shelby said. “Yeah, spamming my phone pretty much. But never offering money back.”

As the time went by and the furniture had yet to arrive, the Foxes turned positions and tried to get their money back. Only to find out: “They could not refund my debit card.”

The Foxes say the company told them they had a no-refund policy and the only possible way to get one was to fill out a form and apply, where the refund would only be granted under certain occasions. The whole concept was something that confused the Foxes.

“We never even got a product at this point. It's not even a refund, it's a cancellation,” Brittany Fox said.

So I tried to get in touch with the company. I called the executive board, the phone numbers listed at their corporate websites and the phone number for the North Charleston store location. But all the phone numbers either went straight to voicemail or to dial tone alerting the phone had been disconnected.

After more than an hour, I gave up calling, got in the car and took a trip to the North Charleston store location.

It was the same thing customers like Brittany and Shelby Fox did after having their attempts at communication fall through. But much like the Foxes, when I arrived, I realized there were going to be no answers.

The store was closed with no furniture. Instead, just the remnants of a business.

So why was this the case? I did some digging and found the company had its Better Business Bureau accreditation revoked in January of 2022 for not responding to claims like the Foxes' and others that came in to government offices.

“We had eight complaints over the course of the last six years,” said Bailey Parker, Communications Director for the South Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs. “I'd say the majority of them came in from 2020 to 2022.”

But even the SC Department of Consumer Affairs had a problem contacting Home Décor Outlets.

“They were not getting back to us on a number of these complaints and didn't ever respond to the initial point of contact from us.”

After some more digging, we found out in February of 2022, the company filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. Furthermore, just days after the interview with the Foxes, they received a letter from Georgia’s bankruptcy court suggesting the Home Décor Outlets convert from chapter 11 to chapter 7 bankruptcy. It would mean the company would have to close all their stores and liquidate their assets.

However, the documents still give no timetable on when these claims will be resolved and if any money is guaranteed to these customers.

“Consumers are most likely not going to be the ones that get paid back. First, it's going to be the other major creditors that they probably owe debt to,” Parker said.

We also learned from the Georgia Court of Bankruptcy, the company received loans through Covid relief, which they are required to pay 20 percent back, as well as general business loans, and they have missed 15 out of 19 payments -- not a good sign for customers.

“At the end of the day, if they don't have money, they don't have anything left, they can't pay,” Parker said.

So what are these customers options at this point?

“The only options that a consumer would have is taking the business to magistrates court, which in my opinion, is not a great option,” Parker said.

The money spent on attorneys for magistrate court could be larger than the money lost in some of these claims. Parker does say waiting to see the results of the bankruptcy court might be the best option.

Meanwhile, the Foxes ended up finding a suitable replacement dresser elsewhere. But still, after going through this whole experience, they left one piece of advice for any consumers in the state.

“Don’t just check the reviews on the product, check the reviews on the business.”

North Charleston neighborhood split by I-26 could be reconnected with affordable housing

NORTH CHARLESTON — One day, a 7-year-old Michael Nesbitt walked into an appliance store at the Pinehaven Shopping Center with his parents.This was in the early 1960s, an era when the civil rights movement was sweeping through the country. Cities everywhere, including Charleston and its surrounding communities, were slowly integrating public spaces.Nesbitt’s father, Johnny, had wanted to make a purchase at the store, which sold household items like washing machines, dryers and refrigerators. But he couldn’t. A ...

NORTH CHARLESTON — One day, a 7-year-old Michael Nesbitt walked into an appliance store at the Pinehaven Shopping Center with his parents.

This was in the early 1960s, an era when the civil rights movement was sweeping through the country. Cities everywhere, including Charleston and its surrounding communities, were slowly integrating public spaces.

Nesbitt’s father, Johnny, had wanted to make a purchase at the store, which sold household items like washing machines, dryers and refrigerators. But he couldn’t. A White male store worker told Johnny Nesbitt — a truck driver for 45 years who never missed a day, his son said — that he couldn’t buy the item because the father didn’t have any credit.

The Nesbitt family left the store empty-handed.

A few years later, that incident lingered in the back of the child’s mind when Nesbitt, then 9, watched construction crews clearing homes in Union Heights to make way for the incoming Interstate 26. The highway — the portion from Columbia to Charleston was completed in 1969 — was constructed during a time when “urban renewal” road projects were built throughout Black communities, causing economic and physical damage.

The interstate’s Exit 218 at Spruill Avenue split Union Heights in half. The neighborhood, founded shortly after the Civil War by freed slaves who settled on an abandoned plantation, lost businesses, homes and houses of worship. Furthermore, the project disrupted the community’s cohesiveness and vibrancy.

“I thought to myself, ‘Here they go again — White folks are taking stuff from us,’” said Nesbitt, now 64, recalling how the highway project displaced his aunt’s sweet shop and his family’s church, Francis Brown United Methodist. “We just felt like we were being infringed upon.”

Today, decades later, there is a chance at stitching Union Heights back together while also making good use of the now-vacant Exit 218 property by creating affordable housing on the site. And government officials have a chance to, in a way, right a past wrong. But the effort will have its challenges — mainly in keeping the new houses affordable in the community that has seen property values rapidly rise.

Coming up with a plan

The S.C. Department of Transportation is in the process of transferring to the city ownership of the former site of the interstate exit, now an empty stretch of land between Joppa and Irving avenues.

The ramp was removed during construction of the Port Access Road that leads to the new Leatherman Terminal. A quitclaim deed has been submitted to the Charleston County Register of Deeds office, according to DOT. The transfer of the property was an environmental commitment noted in the community mitigation plan for the port project.

The former highway ramp is now open land with overgrown vegetation. Houses on the north and south sides of the neighborhood — once divided by infrastructure — are now visible to each other. The idea is to fill the empty strip with new homes and mend the once divided neighborhood.

The North Charleston-based Coastal Community Foundation has taken the lead on drafting a preliminary plan for the site. For the past few years, the foundation has been engaged in community conversations up and down the South Carolina coast with neighborhoods to get a sense of the most important needs.

“In those conversations, one of the key areas that came up time and again was affordable housing,” CCF program officer Kaela Hammond told dozens of people during an Aug. 23 Union Heights neighborhood meeting.

Since 2017, the foundation has partnered with Boeing to work with local organizations to help implement affordable housing in North Charleston neighborhoods. To that end, the foundation partnered with F.A. Johnson II, a developer who has been dubbed CCF’s technical adviser, to survey potential properties for new homes.

“One site that kept coming up throughout all the community conversations we had was the former Exit 218,” Hammond said.

CCF’s role in all of this is to bring together community groups — such as Habitat For Humanity, the Community First Land Trust and others — to help create a vision for the site.

“Our goal is to bring those partners together with community residents to make sure that this property is developed in a way that’s respectful of the community fabric, your history here, and that’s really driven by community input,” Hammond told residents at the meeting.

Johnson concurred.

“The real big question is how do we keep this in quasi-public hands?” he said. “Certainly a private developer could come in, purchase it and do something that’s not consistent (with) what goals and objectives may be communitywide.”

The city seems to be amenable to CCF’s proposal. Councilman Michael Brown called the idea a “good plan” and said the overall goal for the Exit 218 property is to see affordable housing on the site.

Making the homes affordable

The challenge remains in how these organizations can keep newly built homes at a reasonable price.

The proposal, which is not finalized, was presented during the Aug. 23 meeting to solicit community feedback before it is presented to the city for consideration. It calls for 30 houses across the 2-acre lot. Roughly $3.6 million to $4.1 million would likely need to be raised as subsidy to build the homes at affordable levels, Johnson said.

The cheapest range proposed for the houses was $154,000 to $220,000. That’s for a single-family household making $51,000 to $73,000, which is 80 percent of the Charleston area median income, Johnson said.

Many residents said the proposed price range is not based on a realistic assessment of the incomes of the people in Union Heights. Doris Ferguson said she is concerned that those who rent houses in the neighborhood wouldn’t be able to afford to buy the new homes, if they’re ever built.

“You should base it on the income of the people here if you want to give us a chance,” Ferguson said.

Other concerns, like flooding, were also raised. The neighborhood is known to see high water levels when it rains. Residents at the meeting said they have complained about flooding for years, but nothing has been done to fix the problem. New homes will only exacerbate the issue, they said.

The North Charleston-based Community First Land Trust, a local organization formed several years ago with the goal of creating affordable housing in communities, could play a role in keeping the homes affordable.

More than 200 land trusts exist nationwide, and they are designed to help low-income homeowners build equity.

Typically, the land trust first obtains the land. It then engages a contractor to build homes on the properties. People then buy the homes at reasonable prices, but the trust keeps the land so that residents are not displaced.

The Community First trust has a partnership with Habitat for Humanity. Through their collaboration, Habitat has already built two homes in the neighborhood on lots owned by the trust. Two more homes are in the works.

The houses will sell for about $160,000, said Skip Mikell, who’s with the land trust and also serves as president of the Union Heights neighborhood association.

The Exit 218 project could be an effort to help fend off gentrification, something that has already touched the community that is increasingly seeing more White homeowners and new development on the fringes.

Like several other neighborhoods between Charleston and North Charleston in what is known as the Neck Area, Union Heights has seen property values skyrocket due to developmental pressure from areas both north and south of its boundaries.

Nesbitt said he, like other Union Heights homeowners, get calls almost daily from people seeking to buy and likely flip the property for large profits.

“The calls have become borderline harassment,” Nesbitt said.

Some in the neighborhood are excited about the prospect of getting the Exit 218 land returned to the community.

“I was excited about the fact that we could knit our community back,” said Henrietta Woodward. “Why should we not get that property back?”

Community meeting Saturday to discuss I-526 Lowcountry Corridor West project

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Department of Transportation is looking for the community’s input as developers continue to move forward with the I-526 Lowcountry Corridor West Project.There will be a community mitigation meeting in North Charleston Saturday where project directors will update the public on their plan and give them time to ask questions.According to the project’s ...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Department of Transportation is looking for the community’s input as developers continue to move forward with the I-526 Lowcountry Corridor West Project.

There will be a community mitigation meeting in North Charleston Saturday where project directors will update the public on their plan and give them time to ask questions.

According to the project’s official website, it would span approximately 9.7 miles between Paul Cantrell Boulevard in West Ashley and Virginia Avenue in North Charleston.

Project Director Joy Riley says the purpose of the meeting is to update the public on the community mitigation plan. Riley says this is their way of creating benefits for the communities that will be directly impacted by the project.

Russelldale, Ferndale, Liberty Park and Highland Terrace are the communities that will be directly impacted. These are predominantly minority communities.

Riley says over the last three years they have been checking in with those communities and are trying to make sure the community mitigation plan addresses their concerns.

Residents have shared one of their biggest concerns is losing their homes due to the widening of the 526/I-26 interchange.

Riley says a lot of the programs in the community mitigation plan are focused on increasing things like generational wealth, building affordable housing, scholarships, and job training opportunities.

About 100 households will be torn down for this project. Riley says construction won’t get started until all residents have been relocated to replacement housing they are planning on building.

“We are planning on building 100 new apartment units that are affordable but also 45 single-family lots with single-family homes, and a first-time home buyer grant program that helps those folks that are low income,” Riley says.

Although widening the interstate will get rid of homes in the area, officials believe it will help limit travel times, congestion and more.

Devin Clark, a West Ashley resident, says he sees accidents all the time on the 526/I-26 interchange, and it often takes 20 minutes or more to go a few miles. Clark says he’s happy SCDOT is planning on doing something about it.

Saturday’s meeting starts at 10 a.m. at the Ferndale Community Center in North Charleston.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.