Tree Trimming in Sullivan's Island

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The Planet Green Tree Service Difference

At Planet Green Tree Service, we are firm believers that trees make the world a better place. They provide us with verdant beauty, cool shade, and emergency shelter. They raise our home values, add personality to our neighborhoods, and provide us with clean air to breathe. When your home or business has well-maintained, healthy trees, everyone benefits. That’s why we are so passionate about providing our customers with dependable tree services in the Lowcountry.

We believe that honest prices, state-of-the-art equipment, friendly arborists, and good old-fashioned hard work are what set us apart from our competition. With more than 33 years of service in South Carolina, you can rest easy knowing every member of the Planet Green team is committed to the following:

Our customers mean a lot to us, which is why we strive to provide them the best, most helpful customer service in our industry. When you hire our company to perform a tree service in cityname, know that we take this responsibility seriously and will always treat your home like we would treat our own. At Planet Green Tree Service, you won’t ever have to worry about sneaky hidden fees or outrageous pricing. We believe every homeowner and business owner should have access to affordable tree services, which is why we set our rates at reasonable levels. Our job is to protect your home, your trees, and also your wallet!

Service Areas

Whether your home has overgrown trees that need trimming or you have an unsightly stump that needs grinding, our team of tree experts is here to help. Curious what kind of tree care work we provide to homeowners in South Carolina?

Planet Green specializes in the following areas:

Tree Trimming in Sullivan's Island

Have you noticed your favorite tree growing in a strange shape? Are your trees or shrubs so overgrown that it’s making your property and home look unkempt? Are the trees near your home weighed down by dangerous dead branches? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, it might be time to speak with a Planet Green Tree Service professional to find a solution.

Like anything that lives, trees respond to their environment. When trees are not properly maintained, they can cause a whole host of problems for the homeowner. Overgrowth doesn’t just look bad – it can be a potential safety hazard and liability for your home. To prevent this from happening, it’s crucial that your trees are trimmed and pruned regularly. Trimming your trees and shrubs gives your home a tidy, appealing look and facilitates healthy plant and tree growth.

Because every tree and shrub is different, you must approach tree trimming with a plan. Before you start hacking at your trees with a machete, be sure to contact Planet Green Tree Service. Our team of expert arborists will come to your home and determine the best path to take for your tree trimming needs. We always take into account variables like the strengths, weaknesses, and species of your trees.

Benefits of Tree Trimming in Sullivan's Island

For some folks, tree trimming seems like a minor detail in the grand scheme of homeownership. It can be a tedious job, but keeping your trees trimmed and well-maintained is more important than you might think. Below are just a few of the many benefits of keeping your trees and shrubs trimmed:

Tree Health

Part of the Planet Green pruning and trimming process includes the removal of damaged, broken, dead, and diseased branches. When ignored, these dead or dying branches can cause harmful fungi to wreak havoc on the trees around your home or business. Removing these weakened branches helps prevent fungi and keeps your trees healthy. In addition, tree trimming also lets more sunlight and air circulation reach your trees, boosting overall health.

Safety​

As longtime residents of South Carolina, we know how dangerous hurricanes and heavy storms can be. Strong winds from these natural occurrences can cause branches to fall or even be carried away with significant force. This is concerning for many homeowners, especially those who have trees lining their driveways, recreational areas, and walking paths. When you trust Planet Green with your trimming needs, you are actually doing your part to “storm proof” your home from hazardous tree-related accidents. If you have low-hanging branches close to your roof or business, pruning these trees can provide more safety and overhead clearance. That way, don’t have an anxiety attack every time a storm rolls through your neighborhood.

Aesthetics

Nobody likes the look of an overgrown, disheveled tree. Tree trimming improves the general appearance of your tree and makes your whole yard and home look better.  Tree trimming also prevents your trees from growing weak branches and crotches and helps stop branches from intertwining with one another.

Developmental Tree Trimming

Pruning younger trees is key to protecting them as they age. This vital tree service in Sullivan's Island keeps young trees aesthetically appealing and promotes proper structural integrity and optimal branch structure. In addition, as your home’s landscape matures, taking the time to trim young trees reduces the chance of expensive problems like tree failure.

Types of Tree Trimming

Not all tree trimming services from Planet Green Tree Service are the same. Our experts specialize in a number of different tree trimming services to ensure you are getting the right kind of trim for the appropriate situation. Because even the smallest mistake can permanently affect your tree’s health, we approach every tree trimming job with surgeon-like precision. That way, you know your trees are in capable, responsible hands. 

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Crown Reduction

When your trees age without the proper kind of care, they can develop too many branches on their interior. Trees like this give great shade, but too much is not a good sign. That’s where crown reduction trimming comes in. By reducing the density of your tree’s crown, our tree care experts improve its growth rate and health. Crown density reduction also promotes a longer lifespan and a more beautiful appearance.

Deadwooding

As the name implies, deadwooding involves the trimming of dead wood from your trees. Often required in urban and suburban areas, deadwooding a tree makes it look more attractive and livelier, while maintaining the health of your tree’s trunk by removing rotted branches. This process also makes it safer for kids and other people who walk underneath or near your tree that may be harmed by rotting branches that fall. Other tree trimming services that Planet Green offers include: hazardous tree assessments, shrub trimming, pruning, cabling, bracing, and corrective trimming.

Stump Removal in Sullivan's Island

For most property owners, removing a tree can seem like a major project. While that notion certainly isn’t wrong, tree removal is more straightforward and often easier than trying to remove an unsightly stump from your yard. Have you ever wondered why you see so many yards with stumps dotted around the land? It’s because they’re very difficult to remove. That is why Planet Green Tree Service has been offering stump removal services in South Carolina for more than 33 years. Our skilled stump removal experts bring a wealth of knowledge and cutting-edge tools to every stump removal project they tackle.

The fact of the matter is this: trying to remove a stump on your own is an incredible undertaking. Going the “DIY” route can take weeks to complete, even if you spend an hour or two every day. There’s also the issue of operating heavy machinery (which costs time and money to rent) and even light fires to expedite the process, which is dangerous. For these reasons alone, we always recommend that you bring in a professional to remove your tree stump safely and effectively.

Benefits of Stump Removal in Sullivan's Island

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Better Looking Yard

If you are a homeowner that loves sculpted hedges, beautiful landscaping, and a tidy law, removing old tree stumps will feel like a huge weight off of your chest. Stump removal not only gives your home more curb appeal, it can actually raise the value of your home. This is particularly pertinent if you are thinking about listing your home for sale in the near future.

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More Space

If your yard is small, even one stump can reduce the amount of space you have in your yard. If you spend a lot of time playing sports or just enjoying your yard space, stump removal is a huge help. After all, nobody wants to toss a football around if there are a bunch of old stumps that you must avoid. Stumps also take up considerable space below ground, with their complicated root systems. Stump removal will give you and your family more room to plant flowers, grow vegetables, install a water feature, and much more.

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Eliminate Unwanted Growth

When you leave a tree stump in your yard, you could be setting yourself up for unwanted tree growth. This kind of new growth often results in clusters of small trees popping up around the base of the stump. This problem isn’t just unsightly; it can be harmful to any plants near the stump because the new trees will suck up all the water and nutrients out of your soil.

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Pest Prevention

Tree stumps are notorious for harboring all sorts of pests that can damage your hard and cause expensive problems in your home. We’re talking wood borers, ants, termites, and beetles. If you want to do away with these pests and protect your home, the best course of action is to contact Planet Green Tree Service for a quote on our professional tree removal services.

Reduce Headaches

Sure, you could take the time to do your research on how to remove a stump. You could go to Home Depot, rent a high-powered stump grinder, and risk your health trying to operate it without training. You could spend every winking moment of your free time trying to grind the stump down so you can remove it from your yard. But why go through all that trouble when a trustworthy, experienced stump removal company like Planet Green Tree Service is only a phone call away?

Our team of stump removal professionals uses state-of-the-art tools designed to keep your property damage-free during the removal process. We will turn your yard into a beautiful blank slate, so you can focus on enjoying your stump-free while we haul away all the debris.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With 33 years of experience, it’s no wonder why so many South Carolina locals choose Planet Green Tree Service for tree trimming and stump removal in their city. Clients love us because we believe in exceeding your expectations, no matter how large or small a job is.

Contact our office to learn more about our tree services in South Carolina or to schedule your free quote today!

Latest News in Sullivan's Island

ANDY BRACK: Weekend challenge –read the Declaration of Independence

Today’s column was going to be about earmarks and pork-barrel spending. Or why the governor decided to go against the legislature and veto a bunch of spending that lawmakers wanted. And how when any South Carolina governor picks a battle with the General Assembly, particularly over how it wants to spend money, the governor generally loses because we live in a legislative state where intransigence and stubbornness continually catapult us to the bottom of lists. But you’ve probably heard that kind of blather before. S...

Today’s column was going to be about earmarks and pork-barrel spending. Or why the governor decided to go against the legislature and veto a bunch of spending that lawmakers wanted. And how when any South Carolina governor picks a battle with the General Assembly, particularly over how it wants to spend money, the governor generally loses because we live in a legislative state where intransigence and stubbornness continually catapult us to the bottom of lists.

But you’ve probably heard that kind of blather before.

So instead, consider this: What we really need to be doing this weekend as we celebrate the country’s declaration against tyranny is to find a quiet spot to read and then seriously consider the 1,339 words of our Declaration of Independence.

Better yet: Sit down as a family and read it out loud together.

Just six months ago, a bloodthirsty mob misused and misappropriated the fundamental principles enshrouded in American freedom by trying to rip apart our democracy in favor of the very tyranny which our forefathers fought in the fields of Camden and King’s Mountain, the swamps of the Lowcountry and forts from Ninety Six to Sullivan’s Island.

You may know by heart the opening words of the document penned by Thomas Jefferson and others that espouses the values of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” You may remember the part that follows and discusses how it’s the people’s right to alter or abolish a government that fails, which is oft-cited by those who threw the destructive tantrum and bludgeoned the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

But they conveniently forget the cautious words that followed. Perhaps they missed that day in civics class. Or maybe they were so hellbent on getting their own way that they were blinded by the wisdom of colonial leaders who first focused not on a violent overthrow of power, but on reason and intellect to devise a new system to create a safe nation where all could pursue happiness:

“Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.”

The Declaration continued by offering a list of abuses by the King of England. As you read of compounding restrictions that denied liberty to colonists, it should dawn on you how our forefathers eventually corrected those abuses with a constitution that created a representative democracy that became the world’s beacon of freedom, a continuing experiment in liberty that changed the course of humankind.

Furthermore, the Declaration is remarkable in another way. It frames the patience of colonists who wanted better lives for their families. Compare their years of endurance to get redress of their grievances to the volcanic violence that erupted in the halls of freedom over a few hours in January.

The Cassina Group Ends First-Half of 2021 as the #1 Boutique Firm in Charleston

Charleston’s innovative-driven real estate firm, The Cassina Group, finished the first half of 2021 as the #1 boutique firm in all of Charleston. The company has over $406 million* in closed and pending sales so far this year, which outpaces their total sales volume for the previous year. “Throughout the years, The Cassina Group continues to set the tone for attainable luxury, focusing on our clients wants and needs and the unique properties that complement their lifestyles,” said Owen Tyler, Partner and Managing Bro...

Charleston’s innovative-driven real estate firm, The Cassina Group, finished the first half of 2021 as the #1 boutique firm in all of Charleston. The company has over $406 million* in closed and pending sales so far this year, which outpaces their total sales volume for the previous year.

“Throughout the years, The Cassina Group continues to set the tone for attainable luxury, focusing on our clients wants and needs and the unique properties that complement their lifestyles,” said Owen Tyler, Partner and Managing Broker of the company. “We are so grateful to have REALTORS® that are invested in the client experience, and wonderful customers and clients who return year after year.”

In a market where inventory is at historic lows, The Cassina Group has managed to achieve these results by leveraging their impressive network. Nearly 20% of their transactions this year have been handled in-house, with no other brokerages involved.

The boutique firm, with only 39 REALTORS®, has participated in the sale of 82 properties over a million dollars throughout the Lowcountry so far this year. Cassina currently ranks as the number one company by sales volume on Sullivan’s Island. Significant sales on the island include 2411 Atlantic Avenue ($6,850,000; Robertson Allen representing both the buyers and sellers), 1750 Ion Avenue ($4,000,000; Jimmy Dye representing the buyers), 2525 Atlantic Avenue ($3,500,000; Robertson Allen representing the buyers) and 3021 Middle Street ($3,305,001; Robertson Allen representing the buyers).

Other notable transactions handled by Cassina include:
106 Charleston Boulevard, Isle of Palms: 8 beds, 11 full & 2 half baths, 7,164 sq. ft., $4,350,000 (Meghan Webster represented the seller)
7 Dunecrest Lane, Isle of Palms: 7 beds, 8 full & 2 half baths, 4,991 sq. ft., $3,890,000 (Robertson Allen represented the seller & Meghan Webster represented the buyer)
2200 Palm Boulevard, Isle of Palms: 6 beds, 4 baths, 3,000 sq. ft., $3,000,000 (Chris Eller represented the buyers)
121 Live Oak Drive, Old Village: 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 3,369 sq. ft., $3,050,000 (Will Prendergast represented the sellers)
34 New Street, South of Broad: 5 beds, 5.5 baths, 4,280 sq. ft., $3,839,560 (Charles Baarcke represented the sellers)
6 New Town Lane, The Crescent: 5 beds, 5.5 baths, 4,200 sq. ft., $3,695,000 (Robertson Allen represented both the buyers and sellers)

The firm forecasts the second half of the year to be equally strong for Charleston real estate as more and more people relocate to the area, taking advantage of remote work options and the advantageous lifestyle afforded by the Lowcountry.

The innovation-driven real estate firm has a proven reputation for delivering stronger results through leading-edge technology and building lasting relationships. They recently launched a new website, CassinaGroup.com, to showcase their beautiful Lowcountry listings. The company has two offices in Charleston, including downtown Charleston and Mount Pleasant.

For more information on The Cassina Group, please visit their website at CassinaGroup.com.

*Statistics pulled on 7.12.2021

About The Cassina Group
The Cassina Group is a boutique real estate brokerage with offices in Mount Pleasant, SC and Charleston, SC. The firm is managed by Owen Tyler, partner and managing broker, and founding partners Jimmy Dye and Robertson Allen. Recent awards include top honors from Charleston Magazine, Inc. 5000, T3 Sixty and SC Biz News. For more information, visit http://www.CassinaGroup.com or call 843-628-0008.

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Ryan Colby, Amelia Honer win National Clay Court Championships 18s singles titles

Top juniors Ryan Colby (17; Alexandria, Va.) and Amelia Honer (18; Newtown, Pa.) each won singles titles at last week’s USTA Boys’ and Girls’ 18s National Clay Court Championships to earn wild card entries into the 2021 US Open Junior Championships. The USTA National Clay Court Championships, one of five junior USTA National Championship events in 2021 that make up the USTA adidas Junior Championship Series, were held last week at seven locations across the country with singles and doubles competition a...

Top juniors Ryan Colby (17; Alexandria, Va.) and Amelia Honer (18; Newtown, Pa.) each won singles titles at last week’s USTA Boys’ and Girls’ 18s National Clay Court Championships to earn wild card entries into the 2021 US Open Junior Championships.

The USTA National Clay Court Championships, one of five junior USTA National Championship events in 2021 that make up the USTA adidas Junior Championship Series, were held last week at seven locations across the country with singles and doubles competition across the 18s, 16s, 14s and 12s age groups.

Colby, a Junior Tennis Champions Center product, was seeded No. 17 in the boys’ 18s draw and knocked off No. 9 seed Nicholas Heng (Madison, Ala.) in a straight-sets final win. The rising senior is a verbal commit to play college tennis at USC.

Meanwhile, the seventh-seeded duo of Lucas Brown (Plano, Texas) and Sebastian Sec (New York) brought home the boys’ 18s doubles title, defeating Alex Michelsen (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) and Conrad Brown (Irvine, Calif.) in the championship match.

In the girls’ 18s final, the ninth-seeded Honer cruised to a straight-sets victory over No. 8 seed Ariana Pursoo (Bay Shore, N.Y.), 6-4, 6-0. Honer, a recent high school graduate, will play college tennis next season at UC Santa Barbara. Pursoo also made the girls’ 18s doubles final alongside partner Seren Agar (Chatham, N.J.), as the duo fell to the sixth-seeded pair of Vivian Miller (Sullivan’s Island, S.C.) and Maddy Zampardo (Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich.).

Both 16s singles finals pitted Floridians against New Yorkers as Felipe Pinzon (Sunrise, Fla.) defeated No. 12 seed Ari Cotoulas (Brooklyn, N.Y.), 5-7, 6-2, 6-3, in the boys’ 16s final, while Kaitlin Quevedo (Naples, Fla.) knocked off No. 10 seed Tola Glowacka (Glen Head, N.Y.) in the final of the girls’ 16s draw, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3.

Darwin Blanch (Deerfield Beach, Fla.) continued the winning ways for Floridians by claiming the boys’ 14s singles title, defeating top-seeded Braeden Gelletich (Goshen, N.Y.), while fourth-seeded Tianmei Wang (San Marino, Calif.) defeated No. 6 seed Claire Hill (Cary, N.C.) to win the girls’ 14s singles title.

Jack Secord (Lake Forest, Ill.) and Ciara Harding (Boca Raton, Fla.) wrapped up the prestigious list of singles champions, winning the boys’ and girls’ 12s titles, respectively. Harding was also a doubles finalist.

Finals results from the USTA National Clay Court Championships are below. The complete draws are available here.

Each year, more than 120,000 players compete in USTA junior tournaments. Players compete in levels of competition through earned advancement in the 10s, 12s, 14s, 16s and 18s age divisions. USTA junior tournaments help kids take their game as far as they want—high school, college or the pros—or just have fun competing.

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Boys’ 18s

Delray Beach, Fla., July 11-18

Singles: (17) Ryan Colby (Alexandria, Va.) d. (9) Nicholas Heng (Madison, Ala.), 7-6(4), 6-3

Doubles: (7) Lucas Brown (Plano, Texas) / Sebastian Sec (New York) d. (17) Alex Michelsen (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) / Conrad Brown (Irvine, Calif.), 6-3, 7-5

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Girls’ 18s

Mount Pleasant, S.C., July 11-18

Singles: (9) Amelia Honer (Newtown, Pa.) d. (8) Ariana Pursoo (Bay Shore, N.Y.), 6-4, 6-0

Doubles: (6) Vivian Miller (Sullivan’s Island, S.C.) / Maddy Zampardo (Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich.) d. (11) Seren Agar (Chatham, N.J.) / Pursoo, 7-6(2), 6-2

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Boys’ 16s

Delray Beach, Fla., July 11-18

Singles: (17) Felipe Pinzon (Sunrise, Fla.) d. (12) Ari Cotoulas (Brooklyn, N.Y.), 5-7, 6-2, 6-3

Doubles: (10) Caden Hasler (American Fork, Utah) / Dylan Tsoi (Dorado Hills, Calif.) d. (1) Cooper Woestendick (Olathe, Kan.) / Stefan Regalia (Arlington, Va.), 4-6, 6-3 [10-2]

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Girls’ 16s

Huntsville, Ala., July 11-18

Singles: (33) Kaitlin Quevedo (Naples, Fla.) d. (10) Tola Glowacka (Glen Head, N.Y.), 2-6, 6-2, 6-4

Doubles: Stephanie Yakoff (Fort Lee, N.J.) / Natalia Perez (Guaynabo, Puerto Rico) d. Maren Urata (La Canada Flintridge, Calif.) / Sophia Webster (El Segundo, Calif.), 6-2, 6-4

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Boys’ 14s

Miami Beach, Fla., July 11-18

Singles: (9) Darwin Blanch (Deerfield Beach, Fla.) d. (1) Braeden Gelletich (Goshen, N.Y.), 6-3, 6-3

Doubles: (14)Maximus Dussault (Stuart, Fla.) / Maxwell Exsted (Savage, Minn.) d. (4) Ian Mayew (Cary, N.C.) / Oliver Narbut (Chapel Hill, N.C.), 6-3, 7-6(4)

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Girls’ 14s

Plantation, Fla., July 11-18

Singles: (4) Tianmei Wang (San Marino, Calif.) d. (6) Claire Hill (Cary, N.C.), 7-5, 6-3

Doubles: (1) Katie Rolls (Plymouth, Mich.) / Claire An (New York) d. (17) Alanis Hamilton (Bentonville, Ark.) / Hadley Appling (Crestwood, Ky.), 6-1, 7-5

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Boys’ 12s

Orlando, Fla., July 11-18

Singles: (1) Jack Secord (Lake Forest, Ill.) d. (13) Teodor Davidov (Denver), 6-4, 6-1

Doubles: (2) Ryan Cozad (Alpharetta, Ga.) / Yannik Alvarez (Cumming, Ga.) d. (1) Colin McPeek (Carmel, Ind.) / Navneet Raghuram (Fenton, Mo.), 6-4, 6-2

USTA National Clay Court Championships – Girls’ 12s

Fort Lauderdale, Fla., July 11-18

Singles: (3) Ciara Harding (Boca Raton, Fla.) d. (17) Kristina Penickova (Campbell, Calif.), 6-4, 7-5

Doubles: (3) Bela Martinez (San Juan, Puerto Rico) / Anita Tu (Jacksonville, Fla.) d. (2) Harding / Abigail Gordon (Boca Raton, Fla.), 6-3, 6-3

IOP beachgoers harassed sea turtle that was trying to lay a nest

ISLE OF PALMS — A group of Isle of Palms beachgoers were spotted shining lights on a nesting loggerhead sea turtle on July 24, scaring the mother back into the water before she could lay a clutch of eggs. The leader of a volunteer group that patrols the beach for new nests said it’s likely the same turtle returned to shore and laid a nest anyway just a few blocks away, but warned that members of the public should steer clear of mothers if they encounter them on the sand. Mary Pringle, of the Island Turtle Team, said...

ISLE OF PALMS — A group of Isle of Palms beachgoers were spotted shining lights on a nesting loggerhead sea turtle on July 24, scaring the mother back into the water before she could lay a clutch of eggs.

The leader of a volunteer group that patrols the beach for new nests said it’s likely the same turtle returned to shore and laid a nest anyway just a few blocks away, but warned that members of the public should steer clear of mothers if they encounter them on the sand.

Mary Pringle, of the Island Turtle Team, said the group got a report of a crowd with phone lights trained on the female loggerhead over the weekend. The watchers didn’t touch the turtle or get closer than 10 feet to it, Pringle said, but the light and commotion was enough to scare the massive reptile and send her back to the ocean.

“If a turtle is not settled in and laying the eggs, she will definitely go back around and enter the water,” Pringle said. “People don’t know. In their defense, they’re just excited to see a turtle and don’t think.”

She thinks the same turtle laid a nest not far away because Pringle’s group measured the distance between flipper marks on the turtle’s tracks in the sand at the two locations, and they were the same.

Most turtle nests are protected by the volunteers who mark them on the beaches across South Carolina or move them to higher ground, if laid in a vulnerable spot. Bothering loggerhead sea turtles is a federal offense under the Endangered Species Act that can result in civil fines up to $25,000 and a year in jail, said Erin Weeks, a spokeswoman for the S.C. Department of Natural Resources.

But Charlotte Hope, a biologist with SCDNR’s marine turtle conservation program, said it’s uncommon for these cases to make it to trial. And, usually, people are just curious.

“It’s certainly very rare that we get people that are doing anything malicious. They just don’t know what they’re doing, and they walk up with a bright light, that kind of thing,” Hope said.

The more typical form of harassment is poaching of eggs from nests, she said. But it’s hard to track encounters with mothers, because turtles have “false crawls” all the time, where they scramble up on the beach and turn around without laying a nest, Hope said, often for no clear reason.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries section recommends removing beach equipment, picking up trash, filling in holes on the beach and not letting light shine on the sand at night, including from houses nearby. Beachgoers should never attempt to feed or touch a nesting turtle or hatchling and keep their distance.

Nesting season runs from May through October. As of June 26, there had been 32 nests on IOP and 13 on adjacent Sullivan’s Island, numbers Pringle called “a good season but not a bumper crop.” Across the state, 4,964 loggerhead nests have been laid so far.

Reach Chloe Johnson at 843-735-9985. Follow her on Twitter @_ChloeAJ.

BRACK: Read the Declaration of Independence during holiday week

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher: Now that the fireworks and festivities from the Fourth of July are a new memory, how about taking a bolder, more reflective step to celebrate the true spirit of America? Find a quiet spot and seriously consider the 1,339 words of our country’s declaration against tyranny, our Declaration of Independence. Better yet: Sit down as a family and read it out loud together. Just...

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher: Now that the fireworks and festivities from the Fourth of July are a new memory, how about taking a bolder, more reflective step to celebrate the true spirit of America? Find a quiet spot and seriously consider the 1,339 words of our country’s declaration against tyranny, our Declaration of Independence.

Better yet: Sit down as a family and read it out loud together.

Just six months ago, a bloodthirsty mob misused and misappropriated the fundamental principles enshrouded in American freedom by trying to rip apart our democracy in favor of the very tyranny which our forefathers fought in the fields of Camden and King’s Mountain, the swamps of the Lowcountry and forts from Ninety Six to Sullivan’s Island.

You may know by heart the opening words of the document penned by Thomas Jefferson and others that espouses the values of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” You may remember the part that follows and discusses how it’s the people’s right to alter or abolish a government that fails, which is oft-cited by those who threw the destructive tantrum and bludgeoned the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

But they conveniently forget the cautious words that followed. Perhaps they missed that day in civics class. Or maybe they were so hellbent on getting their own way that they were blinded by the wisdom of colonial leaders who first focused not on a violent overthrow of power, but on reason and intellect to devise a new system to create a safe nation where all could pursue happiness:

“Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.”

The Declaration continued by offering a list of abuses by the King of England. As you read of compounding restrictions that denied liberty to colonists, it should dawn on you how our forefathers eventually corrected those abuses with a constitution that created a representative democracy that became the world’s beacon of freedom, a continuing experiment in liberty that changed the course of humankind.

Furthermore, the Declaration is remarkable in another way. It frames the patience of colonists who wanted better lives for their families. Compare their years of endurance to get redress of their grievances to the volcanic violence that erupted in the halls of freedom over a few hours in January.

And so in 1776, 56 men from 13 colonies signed the Declaration of Independence. The oldest was Benjamin Franklin, then 70, of Pennsylvania The youngest was Edward Rutledge, 26, of South Carolina.

The document ends like this: “And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”

That’s the difference between what happened back then and this year: One was bound with honor, community, faith, goodwill and justice. The other had none.

Andy Brack is editor and publisher of Charleston Currents, and publisher of the Charleston City Paper. Have a comment? Send to: editor@charlestoncurrents.com.

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