Tree Trimming in James Island

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The Planet Green Tree Service Difference

At Planet Green Tree Service, we are firm believers that trees make the world a better place. They provide us with verdant beauty, cool shade, and emergency shelter. They raise our home values, add personality to our neighborhoods, and provide us with clean air to breathe. When your home or business has well-maintained, healthy trees, everyone benefits. That’s why we are so passionate about providing our customers with dependable tree services in the Lowcountry.

We believe that honest prices, state-of-the-art equipment, friendly arborists, and good old-fashioned hard work are what set us apart from our competition. With more than 33 years of service in South Carolina, you can rest easy knowing every member of the Planet Green team is committed to the following:

Our customers mean a lot to us, which is why we strive to provide them the best, most helpful customer service in our industry. When you hire our company to perform a tree service in cityname, know that we take this responsibility seriously and will always treat your home like we would treat our own. At Planet Green Tree Service, you won’t ever have to worry about sneaky hidden fees or outrageous pricing. We believe every homeowner and business owner should have access to affordable tree services, which is why we set our rates at reasonable levels. Our job is to protect your home, your trees, and also your wallet!

Service Areas

Whether your home has overgrown trees that need trimming or you have an unsightly stump that needs grinding, our team of tree experts is here to help. Curious what kind of tree care work we provide to homeowners in South Carolina?

Planet Green specializes in the following areas:

Tree Trimming in James Island

Have you noticed your favorite tree growing in a strange shape? Are your trees or shrubs so overgrown that it’s making your property and home look unkempt? Are the trees near your home weighed down by dangerous dead branches? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, it might be time to speak with a Planet Green Tree Service professional to find a solution.

Like anything that lives, trees respond to their environment. When trees are not properly maintained, they can cause a whole host of problems for the homeowner. Overgrowth doesn’t just look bad – it can be a potential safety hazard and liability for your home. To prevent this from happening, it’s crucial that your trees are trimmed and pruned regularly. Trimming your trees and shrubs gives your home a tidy, appealing look and facilitates healthy plant and tree growth.

Because every tree and shrub is different, you must approach tree trimming with a plan. Before you start hacking at your trees with a machete, be sure to contact Planet Green Tree Service. Our team of expert arborists will come to your home and determine the best path to take for your tree trimming needs. We always take into account variables like the strengths, weaknesses, and species of your trees.

Benefits of Tree Trimming in James Island

For some folks, tree trimming seems like a minor detail in the grand scheme of homeownership. It can be a tedious job, but keeping your trees trimmed and well-maintained is more important than you might think. Below are just a few of the many benefits of keeping your trees and shrubs trimmed:

Tree Health

Part of the Planet Green pruning and trimming process includes the removal of damaged, broken, dead, and diseased branches. When ignored, these dead or dying branches can cause harmful fungi to wreak havoc on the trees around your home or business. Removing these weakened branches helps prevent fungi and keeps your trees healthy. In addition, tree trimming also lets more sunlight and air circulation reach your trees, boosting overall health.

Safety​

As longtime residents of South Carolina, we know how dangerous hurricanes and heavy storms can be. Strong winds from these natural occurrences can cause branches to fall or even be carried away with significant force. This is concerning for many homeowners, especially those who have trees lining their driveways, recreational areas, and walking paths. When you trust Planet Green with your trimming needs, you are actually doing your part to “storm proof” your home from hazardous tree-related accidents. If you have low-hanging branches close to your roof or business, pruning these trees can provide more safety and overhead clearance. That way, don’t have an anxiety attack every time a storm rolls through your neighborhood.

Aesthetics

Nobody likes the look of an overgrown, disheveled tree. Tree trimming improves the general appearance of your tree and makes your whole yard and home look better.  Tree trimming also prevents your trees from growing weak branches and crotches and helps stop branches from intertwining with one another.

Developmental Tree Trimming

Pruning younger trees is key to protecting them as they age. This vital tree service in James Island keeps young trees aesthetically appealing and promotes proper structural integrity and optimal branch structure. In addition, as your home’s landscape matures, taking the time to trim young trees reduces the chance of expensive problems like tree failure.

Types of Tree Trimming

Not all tree trimming services from Planet Green Tree Service are the same. Our experts specialize in a number of different tree trimming services to ensure you are getting the right kind of trim for the appropriate situation. Because even the smallest mistake can permanently affect your tree’s health, we approach every tree trimming job with surgeon-like precision. That way, you know your trees are in capable, responsible hands. 

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Crown Reduction

When your trees age without the proper kind of care, they can develop too many branches on their interior. Trees like this give great shade, but too much is not a good sign. That’s where crown reduction trimming comes in. By reducing the density of your tree’s crown, our tree care experts improve its growth rate and health. Crown density reduction also promotes a longer lifespan and a more beautiful appearance.

Deadwooding

As the name implies, deadwooding involves the trimming of dead wood from your trees. Often required in urban and suburban areas, deadwooding a tree makes it look more attractive and livelier, while maintaining the health of your tree’s trunk by removing rotted branches. This process also makes it safer for kids and other people who walk underneath or near your tree that may be harmed by rotting branches that fall. Other tree trimming services that Planet Green offers include: hazardous tree assessments, shrub trimming, pruning, cabling, bracing, and corrective trimming.

Stump Removal in James Island

For most property owners, removing a tree can seem like a major project. While that notion certainly isn’t wrong, tree removal is more straightforward and often easier than trying to remove an unsightly stump from your yard. Have you ever wondered why you see so many yards with stumps dotted around the land? It’s because they’re very difficult to remove. That is why Planet Green Tree Service has been offering stump removal services in South Carolina for more than 33 years. Our skilled stump removal experts bring a wealth of knowledge and cutting-edge tools to every stump removal project they tackle.

The fact of the matter is this: trying to remove a stump on your own is an incredible undertaking. Going the “DIY” route can take weeks to complete, even if you spend an hour or two every day. There’s also the issue of operating heavy machinery (which costs time and money to rent) and even light fires to expedite the process, which is dangerous. For these reasons alone, we always recommend that you bring in a professional to remove your tree stump safely and effectively.

Benefits of Stump Removal in James Island

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Better Looking Yard

If you are a homeowner that loves sculpted hedges, beautiful landscaping, and a tidy law, removing old tree stumps will feel like a huge weight off of your chest. Stump removal not only gives your home more curb appeal, it can actually raise the value of your home. This is particularly pertinent if you are thinking about listing your home for sale in the near future.

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More Space

If your yard is small, even one stump can reduce the amount of space you have in your yard. If you spend a lot of time playing sports or just enjoying your yard space, stump removal is a huge help. After all, nobody wants to toss a football around if there are a bunch of old stumps that you must avoid. Stumps also take up considerable space below ground, with their complicated root systems. Stump removal will give you and your family more room to plant flowers, grow vegetables, install a water feature, and much more.

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Eliminate Unwanted Growth

When you leave a tree stump in your yard, you could be setting yourself up for unwanted tree growth. This kind of new growth often results in clusters of small trees popping up around the base of the stump. This problem isn’t just unsightly; it can be harmful to any plants near the stump because the new trees will suck up all the water and nutrients out of your soil.

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Pest Prevention

Tree stumps are notorious for harboring all sorts of pests that can damage your hard and cause expensive problems in your home. We’re talking wood borers, ants, termites, and beetles. If you want to do away with these pests and protect your home, the best course of action is to contact Planet Green Tree Service for a quote on our professional tree removal services.

Reduce Headaches

Sure, you could take the time to do your research on how to remove a stump. You could go to Home Depot, rent a high-powered stump grinder, and risk your health trying to operate it without training. You could spend every winking moment of your free time trying to grind the stump down so you can remove it from your yard. But why go through all that trouble when a trustworthy, experienced stump removal company like Planet Green Tree Service is only a phone call away?

Our team of stump removal professionals uses state-of-the-art tools designed to keep your property damage-free during the removal process. We will turn your yard into a beautiful blank slate, so you can focus on enjoying your stump-free while we haul away all the debris.

Your Premier Tree Service Company in South Carolina

With 33 years of experience, it’s no wonder why so many South Carolina locals choose Planet Green Tree Service for tree trimming and stump removal in their city. Clients love us because we believe in exceeding your expectations, no matter how large or small a job is.

Contact our office to learn more about our tree services in South Carolina or to schedule your free quote today!

Latest News in James Island

Year of the Falcon: AC Flora claims second straight Carlisle Cup trophy

COVID-19 protocols, spur of the moment schedule changes and a shortened playoff season. These were the challenges Midlands public schools experienced during the past SC High School League 2020-21 athletic season. Nevertheless, several schools still managed to collect their share of state titles. Both Lexington (competitive cheer, girls golf) and Gilbert (girls' golf, baseball) came away with two titles each and fellow Lexington School District One school River Bluff upset four-time defending Class 5A boys' basketball champion D...

COVID-19 protocols, spur of the moment schedule changes and a shortened playoff season.

These were the challenges Midlands public schools experienced during the past SC High School League 2020-21 athletic season.

Nevertheless, several schools still managed to collect their share of state titles. Both Lexington (competitive cheer, girls golf) and Gilbert (girls' golf, baseball) came away with two titles each and fellow Lexington School District One school River Bluff upset four-time defending Class 5A boys' basketball champion Dorman for the title.

None was more successful than AC Flora High School. The Columbia school took home a school-record 5 teams state titles:

- football

- competitive cheer

- boys golf

- boys tennis

- baseball

The Falcons were also state runner-up in girls golf and girls lacrosse and had four individual sport or event champions:

- Gracie McCoy (girls golf)

- Tanner Edwards (boys swimming)

- Robert McCray (high jump)

- Girls 4x100 meter relay

The end result for AC Flora was a second Carlisle Cup trophy won in three years as the top athletic program in Class 4A.

Named after former Eastside head football coach John Carlisle, the Carlisle Cup uses a point system which awards points to schools based on their finish in 22 boys’ and girls’ S.C. High School League sports. The rankings determine the top S.C. High School League athletics programs.

AC Flora tied with Eastside for the award two years ago. Because of a shortened athletic year, no Carlisle Cup award was given.

This year, the Falcons' 1120 points total exceeded Eastside by 180 points and was 2nd highest statewide only to Class 5A Wando.

“It should have been three in a row, but we’ll take the two in a row that we’ve got,” AC Flora athletics director Edward Moore said. “It was a lot of extra steps that we had to go through this year and I’ve really proud of our coaches for buying into what the requirements are.

“We saw teams dropping out left and right in various sports and they were a lot of extra things asked of the coaches and teams to get through not just the protocols, but to keep our kids safe and healthy. Everybody bought into it and had no problems doing it. We got a lot of extra help with parents helping out. It was a great way to navigate through these hurdles.”

While golf, boys tennis and baseball added to their championship legacy, it was the first state titles for competitive cheer and football. Since Moore’s arrival six years ago, AC Flora has won a state title in 13 different sports.

Moore credits the coaches for building a championship mindset and putting their teams in play for titles every year. As long as Moore fulfills his duties in providing the resources to obtain success, he expects the Falcons to add more trophies to the school coffers.

A total of eight Midlands schools placed in the top 10 of their respective classifications for the Carlisle Cup. Lexington and River Bluff placed fourth and fifth, respectively, in Class 5A and Chapin tied for ninth with Summerville.

Gilbert and Camden placed sixth and ninth, respectively, in Class 3A.

Andrew Jackson finished fourth and Gray Collegiate tied with Crescent for ninth place in Class 2A.

CARLISLE CUP TOP 10

CLASS 5A

1. Wando (1130)

2. Dorman (840)

3. JL Mann (828.33)

4. Lexington (770)

5. River Bluff (620)

6. Fort Mill (600)

7. Riverside (520)

8. TL Hanna (470)

9 (tie). Chapin & Summerville (460)

CLASS 4A

1. AC Flora (1120)

2. Eastside (940)

3. Hilton Head Island (930)

4. Greenville (760)

5. James Island (740)

6. Catawba Ridge (690)

7. May River (630)

8. Travelers Rest (540)

9. Myrtle Beach (520)

10. North Myrtle Beach (450)

CLASS 3A

1. Bishop England (900)

2. Oceanside Collegiate (836.67)

3. Daniel (700)

4. Seneca (620)

5. Waccamaw (600)

6. Gilbert (550)

7. Powdersville (500)

8. Wren (450)

9. Camden (420)

10. Blue Ridge (400)

CLASS 2A

1. Phillip Simmons (900)

2. Christ Church (840)

3. St. Joseph’s (650)

4. Andrew Jackson (490)

5. Greer Middle College (450)

6. Landrum (410)

7. Legion Collegiate (390)

8. Woodland (360)

9 (tie). Crescent & Gray Collegiate (310)

Summer Research Program Reaches Young Audience with Science, Art

Above: Christian Simmons talks with children about aquatic predators. Talking about science to a room full of fidgety, distractable elementary age kids was a lot easier than College of Charleston marine biology major Christian Simmons expected. On a recent rainy afternoon, Simmons and 12 other students from the College gave lightning (two minute) talks to kids ages 5 to 12 that had them cheering about s...

Above: Christian Simmons talks with children about aquatic predators.

Talking about science to a room full of fidgety, distractable elementary age kids was a lot easier than College of Charleston marine biology major Christian Simmons expected. On a recent rainy afternoon, Simmons and 12 other students from the College gave lightning (two minute) talks to kids ages 5 to 12 that had them cheering about spotted moray eels, seaweed and mud snails.

The presentations were the result of a collaboration between the organization CULTIVATE SciArt, which connects the arts and sciences with larger audiences, the College’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, and the Pink House, a nonprofit neighborhood resource center in West Ashley, which brought children in to learn about the CofC students’ research.

“We were really fortunate to be able to combine public engagement, outreach to underserved communities, student-driven science and interactive art in one event,” says biology professor Bob Podolsky, who has served as the REU program director since 2014.

Podolsky, who is overseeing the final year of a grant that supports the program, says the CULTIVATE event was a “saturating experience for the kids; they were poking around in the marsh, creating art out of sand and holding horseshoe crabs in their hands at the touch tank.”

“Having taken so many science classes where I had to write reports, I was used to using very technical language,” says Simmons. “When writing for the public [in our program blog], I had to take into account their lack of expertise in the field, breaking down large ecological concepts into understandable pieces of information.”

When the students learned that they were each going to present two months of research in two minutes to the children from the Pink House program, Simmons was nervous.

“I knew the REU program and 12 seasons of Shark Tank would provide me the knowledge to plan out and execute a solid elevator pitch,” says Simmons. “But when I found out it would be given to elementary age kids, that’s when I panicked. Children that young can be unapologetically honest, not to mention tougher to please than Gordon Ramsay and Simon Cowell combined. Then I reminded myself that all scientists are big kids with a lot of questions.”

Simmons’ exuberant presentation energized the audience.

“I decided to frame predator-predator interactions as a boxing match so individuals would be able to better understand the different physiological traits of sharks and moray eels, and why predators are important to coral reefs,” he says.

The prestigious REU program is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the College’s School of Sciences and Mathematics (SSM) and combines independent research with activities that promote career development and science communication skills.

“Part of our pitch to NSF to fund the program is to bring scientists out of the ivory tower to communicate clearly about their research to the general public,” says Podolsky. “In our program this year, I had students write their own blog posts, prepare lightning talks for different audiences and be interviewed by a podcast about their research.”

The REU program was cancelled during the summer of 2020 because of the pandemic, but this summer Podolsky was able to restart the program by paring it down to local students to avoid restrictions on travel and housing. Traditionally, hundreds of college students from across the country apply for the program and live on site for 10 weeks. The program’s location at GML puts it right on the Charleston Harbor and within reach of GML’s partners at Fort Johnson, which in a typical year contribute mentors to the program from institutions such as the Medical University of South Carolina, the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology. It’s a unique opportunity for college students to immerse themselves in marine science as practiced by different agencies.

“Breaking the research down to tell a story for different forms of commonly consumed media and audiences helped me to better understand my research,” says Honors College student Sophie Spiegel, a public health major, who documented her research on the benefits of farming seaweed in the blog post “Serving up seaweed: a culinary solution to climate change?

The REU program allowed Spiegel to develop a pilot study that will be the first step in determining if seaweed farming is a viable ecosystem service or food source for Charleston.

And for Emily Dombrowski, a double major in biology and French, the program gave her a variety of new experiences that allowed her to put the skills she’s learned in classes and labs into action in the real world.

“I loved interacting with the crabs and developing the project from the ground up,” says Dombrowski. “I captured each horseshoe crab used in my study from Charleston Harbor. I made the solutions for blood dilution and developed the protocols for heart rate monitoring. It was a really amazing opportunity to apply the critical thinking skills that I’ve learned in classes and labs to my own project. At one point, I had 21 horseshoe crabs ranging from two to nine pounds that I had to come in and take care of each day. It gave me a new appreciation for all the behind the scenes work that goes into conducting research; from taking care of animals to making the materials needed for my project.”

The students’ research will soon be featured on episodes of “Conservation Connection,” a podcast hosted and produced by Chance and Sarah Kathryn Ruder, who run the environmental education nonprofit Last Chance Endeavors.

The REU program will conclude with its summer research colloquium on Aug. 4, 2021, from 9:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the Fort Johnson DNR auditorium at 217 Fort Johnson on James Island.

News13 releases full 2021 high school football schedule for the Grand Strand and Pee Dee

MYRTLE BEACH (WBTW) – The high school football season begins in 3 weeks for most of our area teams. On this Thursday, we have complied the complete schedule week by week for your viewing pleasure. All games kickoff at 7:30pm unless otherwise noted. 2021 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL NEWS13 BLITZ MASTER SCHEDULE: Week 0, August 20: Bluffton (SC) at South Florence Carvers Bay at Waccamaw Carolina Forest at West Brunswick Charlotte Country Day School at Trinity Co...

MYRTLE BEACH (WBTW) – The high school football season begins in 3 weeks for most of our area teams. On this Thursday, we have complied the complete schedule week by week for your viewing pleasure. All games kickoff at 7:30pm unless otherwise noted.

2021 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL NEWS13 BLITZ MASTER SCHEDULE:

Week 0, August 20:

Bluffton (SC) at South Florence
Carvers Bay at Waccamaw
Carolina Forest at West Brunswick
Charlotte Country Day School at Trinity Collegiate (SCISA)
Cheraw at Latta
Conway at North Myrtle Beach
East Clarendon at Green Sea Floyds
Florence Christian at Northwood Academy (SCISA)
Hartsville at Marlboro County
Hemingway at Manning
Hilton Head at Wilson
Hilton Head Christian at King’s Academy (SCISA)
Kingstree at CE Murray
Lake City at Dillon
Lake View at Aynor
Loris at St. James
Lumberton at Fairmont (NC)
Marion at Johnsonville – Thursday at 7:30pm
McBee at Hannah-Pamplico – Thursday at 7:30pm
Philip Simmons at Georgetown
Richland Northeast at Darlington
Scotland (NC) at N. Durham
Timmonsville at Lamar
West Florence at Lexington

Week 1, August 27:

Andrews at Georgetown
Aynor at Socastee
Carvers Bay at Johnsonville
Carolina Academy at Northwood Academy (SCISA)
Christian Academy of MB at Pee Dee Academy (SCISA)
Conway at West Florence
Dillon Christian at Florence Christian (SCISA)
East Clarendon at Lake City
Fairmont at Purnell Swett (NC)
Green Sea Floyds at Mullins
Hannah-Pamplico at Hemingway
Hartsville at May River
Hoke County at Lumberton (NC)
Hoggard at Scotland (NC)
Kingstree at Ridgeland-Hardeeville
King’s Academy at Thomas Sumter (SCISA)
Latta at Andrew Jackson
Manning at South Florence
Marlboro County at Cheraw
Marion at Lamar
McBee at Chesterfield
Myrtle Beach at Carolina Forest
North Myrtle Beach at Loris
St. James at Lake View
Timmonsville at Darlington
Trinity Collegiate at Wilson Hall (SCISA)
Waccamaw at Philip Simmons
Wilson at AC Flora

Week 2, September 3:

Andrews at Carvers Bay
Andrew Jackson at Mullins
Carolina Forest at West Florence
Camden at Hartsville
Cheraw at Darlington
Chesterfield at Hannah-Pamplico
Conway at Myrtle Beach
Dillon at Wilson
Georgetown at Socastee
Great Falls at Timmonsville
Green Sea Floyds at Aynor
Hemingway at Marion
Johnsonville at St. James
Kingstree at Lake City
Lake View at East Clarendon
Lamar at Lakewood
Latta at McBee
Lumberton at Laney (NC)
North Myrtle Beach at West Brunswick (NC)
Pee Dee Academy at Florence Christian (SCISA)
Scotland (NC) at Marlboro County
South Columbus (NC) at Loris
South Florence at Irmo
St. Johns at Dillon Christian (SCISA)
Thomas Sumter at Carolina Academy (SCISA)
Waccamaw at Eugene Ashley (NC)
Westover at Fairmont (NC)
Williamsburg Academy at Christian Academy (SCISA)

Week 3, September 10:

Aynor at James Island
Carolina Bobcats at McBee
Carolina Academy at Spartanburg Christian Academy (SCISA)
Cheraw at Mullins
CE Murray at Kingstree
Darlington at Marlboro County
Dillon at Lake View
Fairmont at Southern Lee (NC)
Florence Christian at Williamsburg Academy (SCISA)
Fort Dorchester at Carolina Forest
Georgetown at Carvers Bay
Great Falls at East Clarendon
Hartsville at Conway
Johnsonville at Hemingway
King’s Academy at Pee Dee Academy (SCISA)
Lake City at West Florence
Lamar at Timberland
Loris at Green Sea Floyds
Lugoff-Elgin at South Florence
Hannah-Pamplico at Latta
Manning at Marion
Scott’s Branch at Andrews
Scotland (NC) at Jack Britt
Socastee at Myrtle Beach
St. James at North Myrtle Beach
St. John Christian at Christian Academy (SCISA)
Thomas Sumter at Dillon Christian (SCISA)
Timmonsville at Lee Central
Trinity Collegiate at Destrehan (SCISA)
Wilson at Woodland

Week 4, September 17:

Carvers Bay at Aynor
Cheraw at Timmonsville
Clinton at Fairmont (NC)
Conway at Blythewood
Dillon Christian at Calhoun County (SCISA)
East Clarendon at North Central
Johnsonville at Latta
Hartsville at North Myrtle Beach
Kingstree at Hemingway
King’s Academy at Carolina Academy (SCISA)
Lake City at Marion
Lamar at Carolina Forest
Lake City at Marion
Lee Academy at Florence Christian (SCISA)
Loris at Lake View
Lumberton at Cape Fear (NC)
McBee at Buford
Mullins at Hannah-Pamplico
Myrtle Beach at Darlington
Scotland (NC) at Hoke County
Socastee at Dillon
St. James at Georgetown
Thomas Sumter at Pee Dee Academy (SCISA)
Timmonsville at Cheraw
Trinity Collegiate at First Baptist (SCISA)
Waccamaw at Andrews
West Florence at Wilson

Week 5, September 24:

Aynor at St. James
Ben Lippen at Trinity Collegiate (SCISA)
Calhoun Academy at King’s Academy (SCISA)
Carolina Forest at Ridge View
Camden Military at McBee
CE Murray at Johnsonville
Darlington at Wilson
Dillon Christian at Carolina Academy (SCISA)
Dorchester Academy at Christian Academy (SCISA)
East Clarendon at Hannah-Pamplico
Fairmont at West Bladen (NC)
Fort Dorchester at Myrtle Beach
Georgetown at Conway
Gilbert at Lamar
Green Sea Floyds at Carvers Bay
James Island at Andrews
Jack Britt at Lumberton (NC)
Lake View at Mullins
Lee at Pee Dee Academy (SCISA)
Legion Collegiate at Hemingway
Marlboro County at Dillon
North Myrtle Beach at South Florence
Scotland (NC) at Southern Lee
Socastee at Loris
Timmonsville at Scott’s Branch
St. Johns at Waccamaw
West Florence at Hartsville

Week 6, October 1:

Andrews at Marion
Carvers Bay at CE Murray
Cheraw at Buford
Conway at St. James
Crestwood at Lake City
Dillon Christian at Lee Academy (SCISA)
East Bladen at Fairmont (NC)
Florence Christian at Laurence Manning (SCISA)
Georgetown at Waccamaw
Great Falls at Lamar
Green Sea Floyds at Lake View
Hammond at Trinity Collegiate (SCISA)
Hannah-Pamplico at Johnsonville
Kingstree at Latta
King’s Academy at St. John’s Christian (SCISA)
Lee Central at Mullins
Loris at Dillon
Lumberton at South View (NC)
Manning at Marlboro County
Myrtle Beach at West Florence
Pee Dee Academy at Williamsburg Academy (SCISA)
Scott’s Branch at East Clarendon
Socastee at Sumter
South Florence at Darlington
Thomas Sumter at Christian Academy (SCISA)
Union Pines at Scotland (NC)
Wilson at North Myrtle Beach

Week 7, October 8:

Carolina Academy at Lee Academy (SCISA)
Carolina Forest at Conway
Cheraw at Central
Christian Academy at King’s Academy (SCISA)
Darlington at North Myrtle Beach
Dillon at Aynor
Florence Christian at Heathwood Hall (SCISA) – Thursday
Green Sea Floyds at Hannah-Pamplico
Hartsville at Myrtle Beach
Hemingway at CE Murray
Lake City at Lakewood
Lamar at McBee
Latta at Lee Central
Lumberton at Gray’s Creek (NC)
Marion at Kingstree
Marlboro County at Crestwood
Mullins at Andrews
Scott’s Branch at Carvers Bay
South Florence at Wilson
Spartanburg Christian at Pee Dee Academy (SCISA)
St. James at Socastee
Timmonsville at Johnsonville
Trinity Collegiate at Porter-Gaud
Waccamaw at Loris
Williamsburg Academy at Dillon Christian (SCISA)

Week 8, October 15:

Andrews at Kingstree
Andrew Jackson at Cheraw
Aynor at Waccamaw
Camden at Lake City
Carolina Academy at Florence Christian (SCISA)
Conway at Socastee
Douglas Byrd at Lumberton (NC)
East Clarendon at Carvers Bay
Fairmont at Red Springs (NC)
Johnsonville at Lake View
Hartsville at South Florence
Hannah-Pamplico at Timmonsville
Hemingway at Scott’s Branch
Heathwood Hall at Trinity Collegiate (SCISA)
King’s Academy at Williamsburg Academy (SCISA)
Lakewood at Marlboro County
Lee Academy at Christian Academy (SCISA)
Lee Central at Marion
Loris at Georgetown
McBee at CA Johnson
Mullins at Latta
North Myrtle Beach at West Florence
Pee Dee Academy at Dillon Christian (SCISA)
Pinecrest at Scotland (NC)
Sumter at Carolina Forest
Wilson at Myrtle Beach

Week 9, October 22:

Dillon Christian at Christian Academy (SCISA)
East Clarendon at Hemingway
Georgetown at Aynor
Great Falls at McBee
Johnsonville at Green Sea Floyds
Kingstree at Mullins
King’s Academy at Lee Academy (SCISA)
Lake View at Timmonsville
Lamar at Lewisville
Latta at Andrews
Lumberton at Seventy-First (NC)
Marlboro County at Lake City
Myrtle Beach at South Florence
North Central at Cheraw
Scotland (NC) at Lee County
Socastee at Carolina Forest
Spartanburg Christian at Florence Christian (SCISA)
St. James at Sumter
St. Pauls at Fairmont (NC)
Trinity Collegiate at Laurence Manning (SCISA)
Waccamaw at Dillon
West Florence at Darlington
Wilson at Hartsville

Week 10, October 29:

Aynor at Loris
Calhoun Academy at Christian Academy (SCISA)
Carolina Academy at Pee Dee Academy (SCISA)
Carolina Forest at St. James
Cardinal Newman at Trinity Collegiate (SCISA)
Camden at Marlboro County
Carvers Bay at Hemingway
CE Murray at East Clarendon
Chesterfield at Cheraw
Darlington at Hartsville
Dillon at Georgetown
Dillon Christian at King’s Academy (SCISA)
Fairmont at Midway (NC)
Florence Christian at Orangeburg Academy (SCISA)
Johnson at Lamar
Kingstree at Lee Central
Lake City at Manning
Lake View at Hannah-Pamplico
Latta at Andrews
McBee at Lewisville
Mullins at Marion
North Myrtle Beach at Myrtle Beach
Purnell Swett at Lumberton (NC)
Richmond at Scotland (NC)
Socastee at Waccamaw
South Florence at West Florence
Sumter at Conway
Timmonsville at Green Sea Floyds

James Island sewer pipe hanging over drainage ditch will be fixed this summer

JAMES ISLAND — A homeowner next to James Island Creek is worried that a rusty sewer pipe may give way and add more pollution to the waterway, which is regularly deemed too dirty to swim in. But officials with the local sewer provider say help is on the way, and that the pipe should be stabilized next month. David Coe, who lives just off Dills Bluff Road, has a yard that sprawls into marshes on the edge of James Island Creek. In a fringe of trees at the edge of his property is a drainage ditch to the marsh, connected by a ...

JAMES ISLAND — A homeowner next to James Island Creek is worried that a rusty sewer pipe may give way and add more pollution to the waterway, which is regularly deemed too dirty to swim in.

But officials with the local sewer provider say help is on the way, and that the pipe should be stabilized next month.

David Coe, who lives just off Dills Bluff Road, has a yard that sprawls into marshes on the edge of James Island Creek. In a fringe of trees at the edge of his property is a drainage ditch to the marsh, connected by a thin pipe to a pond on the other side of the road.

But hanging over the ditch is a rusty 8-inch sewer main. Coe claimed he’s been trying for years to get someone to bolster the pipe, which was once covered by the slope down from Dills Bluff Road. He worries it might corrode enough to break, or that trees at the edge of the eroding bank might fall on it. The dirt around the pipe has washed away because of high tides from the creek, Coe said.

“If that pipe breaks, it’s going to be the biggest disaster James Island Creek could possibly see,” Coe said.

David Hoffman, director of wastewater services for the James Island Public Service District, said that the utility is working on a solution. The PSD is asking for quotes on how much it could cost to bolster the pipe by placing rocks around it and then covering that with concrete, and Hoffman did not have a guess at what the cost might be. The utility also plans to work with the S.C. Department of Transportation, which will clean out the drainage under the road, Hoffman said.

Hoffman said he was first made aware of the problem in April and PSD staff observed the site in June.

“We were at the end of our budget year so we didn’t have a lot of funds at the time,” he said. “We would have fixed it (then) if it was an immediate danger to anybody at that time. It wasn’t. That’s why we delayed the work.”

He expected the work to be completed by mid-August.

Meanwhile, James Island Creek has long had issues with water quality. Andrew Wunderley of Charleston Waterkeeper has been testing the stream for bacteria for nine years. It regularly exceeds bacteria levels the state has set for safe swimming, he said in an interview.

State regulations changed last year and brought stricter rules for James Island Creek and Shem Creek, another waterway that often has high bacteria readings. Wunderley said a taskforce is also working on solutions to improve water quality.

Meanwhile, Wunderley said it needs to be a priority for the PSD to stabilize the pipe — rust alone might not create a leak, but further erosion undermining it or something hitting it could.

Sewer and septic failures can lead to high bacteria levels, “and it’s really important for the public to be aware of this stuff,” Wunderley said.

SC’s best high school athletic programs include Wando, Bishop England, Philip Simmons

Three of the top high school athletic programs in South Carolina are located in the Charleston area. The S.C. Athletic Administrators Association recently announced the winners of the Carlisle Cup in each of the state’s five High School League classifications. The Carlisle Cup recognizes the top athletic programs each year, based on state championships and playoff success. Wando is the Class AAAAA winner for the 2020-21 school year. The athletic program captured state titles in volleyball, girls swimming and girls soccer,...

Three of the top high school athletic programs in South Carolina are located in the Charleston area.

The S.C. Athletic Administrators Association recently announced the winners of the Carlisle Cup in each of the state’s five High School League classifications. The Carlisle Cup recognizes the top athletic programs each year, based on state championships and playoff success.

Wando is the Class AAAAA winner for the 2020-21 school year. The athletic program captured state titles in volleyball, girls swimming and girls soccer, and was the state runner-up in boys swimming, boys tennis and girls lacrosse. Wando also was Lower State runner-up in girls basketball and girls tennis, third in girls track and fourth in boys track.

Bishop England was the top program in Class AAA this year. The Bishops won state titles in girls tennis, boys cross country, girls lacrosse and boys lacrosse, and were state runners-up in girls basketball, boys golf and boys swimming. The girls cross country team finished third in the state meet and the girls golf team was third in the AAA state tournament.

Philip Simmons earned the award for Class AA. The four-year-old Berkeley County school won state titles in boys tennis, boys track and girls track, while finishing second in boys cross country and girls cross country. The girls tennis team was AA state runner-up as well. The volleyball and girls basketball teams reached the AA Lower State finals.

High school coaches on the move

Summer is often the time for movement among the prep coaching ranks and this summer is no different.

Oceanside Collegiate recently announced the hiring of two new varsity head coaches while an assistant at Berkeley has landed his first head coaching gig.

Oceanside Collegiate filled openings in baseball and softball in recent days. Alecia Robinson will assume duties as the head softball coach next spring. Robinson comes to Oceanside Collegiate from Blue Ridge High School in Greer. Robinson served at Blue Ridge for the last three seasons, guiding the Tigers to an undefeated region record and a Lower State appearance in Class AAAA.

Robinson is a former two-time all-state performer at Tuscola High School in Waynesville, North Carolina, where she holds the school’s career homerun record.

Richie McCullough will take the reins of the successful baseball program. McCullough replaces Jerry Stoots, who was not retained after the 2021 season. McCullough has been an assistant on the varsity team for the last two seasons. Oceanside played for the Class AA state title in 2019 and won 20 games this spring but failed to make the state playoffs.

McCullough is a native of Columbia and is a 1990 graduate of Columbia High. He was a four-year all-region selection and also was named all-state and played in the North-South all-star game.

Prior to his move to Charleston, McCullough spent 11 years as an assistant coach in Lexington.

“I am very appreciative for the opportunity here at Oceanside and would like to thank Mrs. (Brenda) Corley and Coach (Mark) Meyer for putting their trust in me. I love everything about this school.”

Zach Jacobs, who was Berkeley’s junior varsity baseball coach and an assistant coach for the varsity team, has been hired as the varsity head coach at Beaufort High School. Jacobs is a graduate of Berkeley and was an All-Lowcountry selection as a player. He inherits a program that played for the Class AAAA Lower State championship this past spring. The Eagles lost to James Island in the best-of-three Lower State series.

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